Friday, November 16, 2018

The Evergreen Courant's News Flashback for Nov. 16, 2018

USS Hancock (CVA-19)

23 YEARS AGO
NOV. 16, 1995

Evergreen weather observer Harry Ellis reported 0.03 inches of rain on Oct. 30, 0.35 on Oct. 31, 0.17 on Nov. 1, 1.70 inches on Nov. 2, 0.30 inches on Nov. 3, 0.40 inches on Nov. 6, 0.75 inches on Nov. 7, 1.01 inches on Nov. 10 and 0.05 inches on Nov. 11. He reported a high temperature of 75 degrees on Nov. 7 and lows of 30 on Nov. 11 and Nov. 12.

Cindy Sims, daughter of Lomax and Elaine Sims, was named Conecuh County Junior Miss for 1996 at the local program held last Friday night at Reid State College. Cindy will represent Conecuh County in the state Junior Miss program to be held in 1996. She is a senior at Hillcrest High School.

Sgt. Major Bill Adams was the guest speaker at the Veterans Day Program held at Evergreen Junior High School last Thursday morning. Sgt. Major Adams is currently serving as a JROTC instructor at Hillcrest High School. He is a decorated veteran of the Vietnam War.

A ribbon-cutting and grand opening was held last Thursday at Joy’s, Evergreen’s newest business located at 104 Court St. On hand for the ribbon-cutting were Chamber President Mabry Cook, Joy Wilson owner, Mayor Lomax Cassady and Conecuh County Economic Executive Director Jim Clifton. A large crowd was on hand for the event.

Several local former U.S. Marines were on hand last Thursday to celebrate the 220th anniversary of the U.S. Marine Corps at the Veterans Affairs Office on Liberty Street.  

48 YEARS AGO
NOV. 19, 1970

Construction of the Evergreen Holiday Inn is imminent, according to Mayor Henry Sessions. Sale of the bonds has been completed with many buyers not being able to make purchases. Construction is to get underway immediately, probably the first of December.
Mayor Sessions said that in addition to the Holiday Inn, a Gulf Station will also be constructed at the site on Highway 83 at the I-65 interchange on the Richard Tolbert property adjoining Ed E. Reid State Trade School.

Biggest auction ever at stockyard Saturday: The Conecuh Stockyard in Evergreen will be the scene of a giant auction on Sat., Nov. 21.
The auction is sponsored by the Petticoat Service League of Sparta Academy, a private school located in Evergreen.
A highlight of the event will be the drawing for a 1971 Datsun 1200 sports coupe. Musical entertainment will be provided by “Judy and the Country Brand,” a country and western group.

Burt commended for Vietnam service: Michael Burt, airman in the U.S. Navy, has been commended by his commanding officer Capt. N.P. Foss for “outstanding performance of duty while attached to and serving in USS Hancock (CVA-19) as Ground Support Equipment Petty Officer from 1 September 1969 to 26 March 1970 during combat operations against the enemy.”
The Lyeffion High School graduate is the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Burt Jr. of Route 2, Evergreen.

72 YEARS AGO
NOV. 21, 1946

Pvt. L.C. Worrell Jr. left Monday for New Jersey to be shipped overseas soon.

Expenditures to Conecuh County’s unemployed last month and in the preceding month were as follows: To veterans in October, $6,700; to veterans in September, $10,862; to civilians in October, $2,286; to civilians in September, $1,874.

Carmon L. Padgett, farmer living in the Mt. Union community, enjoys the distinction of being the first farmer in the county to pay for his farm under the tenant purchase plan of the Farm Security Administration with profits from his farming operations, and the very remarkable thing is he paid for his farm, together with many improvements in the short period of six and one half years.

Alabama’s cotton crop was estimated at 780,000 bales by the Alabama Cooperative Crop Reporting Service as of Nov. 1. This is 16 percent less than 1945 production and 23 percent below the 10-year, 1935-44, average.

There were 3,526 bales of cotton, counting round as half bales, ginned in Conecuh County, from the crop of 1946 prior to Nov. 1, 1946 as compared with 5,558 bales ginned to Nov. 1, 1945.

87 YEARS AGO
NOV. 19, 1931

The gin report for Conecuh County continues to run far below the one for last year the same date. There were 11,763 bales ginned prior to Nov. 1, as compared to 14,889 bales to the same date in 1930.

For the fourth consecutive year, a club boy from Conecuh County has won the $100 prize trip to the National Club Congress which is offered to club boys in this section by the Chilean Nitrate Co. This year, Edwin Owens, age 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Owens of Bermuda community has been awarded this prize and will make the trip to attend the National Club Congress which is to be held in Chicago the first week in December.

Fire Truck Located At Power Plant: Arrangements have been made to store the fire truck in a shed at the power plant, thus enabling the fire department to answer calls more quickly and at the same time the city will save quite an item in rent. A shed has been constructed on the north side of the power plant building which will take care of the truck. Heretofore, it has been stored in the building to the rear of O.C. McGehee’s Service Station.

Fire Destroys Garage Monday Afternoon: Garage belonging to G.O. Dickey was practically destroyed by a fire of unknown origin late Monday afternoon. The fire department answered the call promptly and extinguished the blaze before the building was entirely destroyed and prevented its spreading to the dwelling nearby.

Thursday, November 15, 2018

World War I's end sparked huge celebration in Evergreen, Alabama

Wilhelm II, German Kaiser during World War I

This week marks the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, an event that resulted in one of the biggest celebrations in the history of Conecuh County. At 11 o’clock in the morning of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, World War I came to an end. The armistice agreement to end the war was signed at 5:10 a.m. on the morning of Mon., Nov. 11, and commanders on the Western Front were telegraphed orders to cease hostilities at 11 a.m. “French time.”

According to the Nov. 13, 1918 edition of The Evergreen Courant, the news of the war’s end did not take long to reach the citizens of Conecuh County. In that day’s paper, under the headline “Evergreen People Celebrate Great War Victory,” it was reported that “Evergreen people celebrated the great war victory Monday afternoon and night with such a demonstration as was never before witnessed in our community. The lid was off and everybody yelled themselves hoarse, discharged fireworks and firearms and made noise in every conceivable manner.

“The people heard the glad news during the early hours of the morning, but having been fooled once before by a false report, they waited to see it in black and white in The Advertiser, and The Advertiser carried the storm in flaming headlines. This satisfied them and everybody was happy.
“Business houses and offices were closed in the afternoon, and the first staring of the celebration began at the City School grounds, patriotic songs, the raising of Old Glory and short speeches by Rev. D.W. Haskew and Attorney E.C. Page, every utterance being received with cheering, and concluding with the burning of the “Kaiser’s Coffin” in a huge bonfire on the campus.

“But this was not all. In the early part of the night, the revelry began in earnest. The blowing of whistles, the yelling and whooping, the rapid discharge of firearms and fireworks kept up till a late hour. Tuesday morning found the streets littered with empty shells and other evidences of the previous night’s fun and frolic. The people of Evergreen, young and old, will long remember Monday night’s demonstration. Everybody laughed and everybody was happy and the happy look and hearty laugh will not wear off.”

In 1918, what we now call “World War I” was called the “Great War,” and it was believed to be the “war to end all wars.” This terrible war claimed the lives of an estimated nine million soldiers, and 21 million more were wounded. Civilian casualties caused by the war are estimated to be close to 10 million.

As best that I can tell from available records, at least 28 Conecuh County soldiers were killed during World War I. Those soldiers include Pvt. Benjamin F. Arant of Belleville, Pvt. Mack Autry of Brooklyn, Pvt. James Atkins of Flat Rock, Pvt. Newton U. Blackman of Evergreen, Pvt. Jodie Booker, Pvt. James W. Brown of Owassa, Pvt. Robert A. Christopher of Flat Rock, Pvt. Jim Crosby of Evergreen, Pvt. Fletcher Darby of Castleberry, Pvt. Dentley Daw of Evergreen, Pvt. Will Dickson of Repton, Cpl. George Ealum, Pvt. Edward E. English of Evergreen, Pvt. William H. Harris of Flat Rock, Pvt. Charlie Johnson of Repton, Pvt. George Jones of Cohassett, Pvt. George Lee of Evergreen, Joshua Lowe of Repton, Pvt. Wly Marshall of Burnt Corn, Pvt. Almer M. Martin of Castleberry, Cpl. Archie D. McCrory of Repton, Pvt. Bryant W. Price, Pvt. Lazarus B. Rabb of Castleberry, Pvt. Emmett N. Richburg of Castleberry, Pvt. Raymond L. Seale of Repton, Pvt. Carl B. Smith of Belleville, Pvt. Roy I. Smith of Evergreen and Pvt. Amos Weatherspoon of Evergreen.

In the end, some of these soldiers are buried in Conecuh County, but others are not, and it’s up to us to remember their sacrifice. I’d like to hear from anyone in the reading audience with more information about the World War I casualties listed above. Also, if you know of any other soldiers from Conecuh County who were killed in World War I not mentioned above, please let me know and I will add them to the list.

Drew Skipper maintains lead in local College Football Pick 'Em Contest


The 11th weekend of the 2018 college football season wrapped up on Saturday, and we also wrapped up another weekend in our local ESPN College Football Pick ‘Em Contest.

This week, after Saturday’s final game came to a close, Drew Skipper found himself in sole possession of the No. 1 spot in the local standings for the third week in a row. Brett Loftin and John Johnston were tied for second place.

Ricky Taylor, Jeremy Matheny and I were all tied for fourth place. Justin Mixon was in the No. 7 spot, and Travis Presley was in eighth place.

Vanessa Sales and Darrel Burch were tied for ninth place. Clint Hyde and Casey Grant were tied for the No. 11 place in the standings.

With that said, if you didn’t do so hot, don’t sweat it. It’s a marathon, not a sprint. We’ve got three more weeks to go, and the standings will no doubt change during the next several weeks as we make the final push toward the end of the season.

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By my count, we’ve got 11 games this weekend featuring SEC teams, but only three are head-to-head conference games. For what it’s worth, here are my picks in those games. I like Alabama over The Citadel (duh), Kentucky over Middle Tennessee, Mississippi State over Arkansas, Florida over Idaho, Missouri over Tennessee, George over UMass, Auburn over Liberty University, Texas A&M over UAB, South Carolina over Chattanooga, Vanderbilt over Ole Miss and LSU over Rice.

Last week: 6-1, Overall: 75-16

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Hillcrest High School blasted a decent Sipsey Valley team Friday night in Evergreen in the opening round of the state playoffs, and the Jags are likely to have their hands full Friday night when they travel to Montgomery to play Alabama Christian Academy in the second round.

Alabama Christian is “sneaky good” and should not be taken lightly. They entered last Friday night’s first-round game against Lincoln with a 3-7 overall record and barely made the playoffs as the No. 4 seed in their region. None of that kept them from upsetting Lincoln, a No. 1-seed, on the road, 18-14.

On paper, Lincoln should have won that game, but Alabama Christian pulled it out. Was Lincoln overrated? Is Alabama Christian a strong team that just happened to play a really tough regular season schedule? The answers are up for debate, but one thing is for sure: Hillcrest better give 100-percent Friday night or they run the risk of getting upset like Lincoln.

Also tomorrow (Friday) night, Andalusia will play No. 10-ranked Headland in Andalusia, and I hope that Andalusia can pull it out. Presuming that Hillcrest and Andalusia both win on Friday night, they will play in the third round on Nov. 23. That should give Hillcrest a big advantage as they look to return to the state championship game again this season.

Andalusia and Hillcrest are both in 4A Region 1, and Andalusia entered the playoffs as the region’s No. 3 seed. Hillcrest whipped Andalusia, 41-10, in Evergreen during their regular season game on Sept. 21, and I think that both teams have improved since that first game. It’s hard to beat a good team twice, but I would give Hillcrest the edge in the rematch.

In the end, it’ll all shake out in the wash, and it will all be moot if Hillcrest doesn’t take care of business tomorrow night in Montgomery. I look for it to be a good game, and I also look for Hillcrest to punch their ticket for the third round. Anything less will be a huge disappointment.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Wilcox Countians celebrated the end of WWI a century ago this week

Lt. Harry Irby Savage of Wilcox County.

This week marks the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I, an event that resulted in one of the biggest celebrations in the history of Wilcox County. At 11 o’clock in the morning of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, World War I came to an end. The armistice agreement to end the war was signed at 5:10 a.m. on the morning of Mon., Nov. 11, and commanders on the Western Front were telegraphed orders to cease hostilities at 11 a.m. “French time.”

According to the Nov. 14, 1918 edition of The Wilcox Progressive Era, the news of the war’s end did not take long to reach the citizens of Wilcox County.

“When the citizenship of Camden arose on Monday morning, they were greeted with the glorious news that Germany had ‘surrendered unconditionally’ and the greatest war that had ever been was closed. Prayers went up in thankfulness to the Almighty that right had triumphed, and this world would not be under the dominion of the warlords, but was safe for Democracy. Mothers, who had sons whose bones rest on French soil, gave vent to their feelings; and while their hearts were bursting with grief, their bosoms swelled with pride that they had given their lives in so great a cause.”

Wilcox County citizens were so happy that the war was finally over that one of the biggest celebrations in the history of the county ensued.

“At 3:30, there was a spontaneous uprising of the citizens, who with the ringing of bells, blowing of whistles and many other devices for making noise gave vent to their feelings,” Editor S.C. Godbold reported in that week’s newspaper. “Patriotic speeches were made by Hons. E.W. Berry, J.M. Bonner, Lee McMillan and Solicitor J.F. Thompson. It would be impossible to describe the emotions of the crowd.

“Mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters shed tears of joy that they would soon be rejoined by their loved ones who are at the front, and the prayers of the entire crowd went up that such would be the case at an early date. There are no more patriotic people on earth than those of Camden and Wilcox County.”

Elsewhere in that week’s paper, Godbold explained to readers that “The Progressive Era columns are a little ‘skimpy’ this week on account of editors and typos being intoxicated with gladness distilled from the war news.”

Godbold also encouraged local educators to take advantage of the historic occasion.

“Every teacher should see that the pupils are given an opportunity to take part in this history making epoch. In the years when the heroes of today have passed to their reward, the young boys and girls of today, will thrill their children with the stories of their part in the momentous struggle.”

In 1918, what we now call “World War I” was called the “Great War,” and it was believed to be the “war to end all wars.” This terrible war claimed the lives of an estimated nine million soldiers, and 21 million more were wounded. Civilian casualties caused by the war are estimated to be close to 10 million.

As best that I can tell from state records, at least 26 Wilcox County soldiers were killed during World War I. Those soldiers include Charley Blackman, William Boykin, William Dumas, William Kelsaw, William Reaves, Harry I. Savage, Howard Singleton and James Williams, all of Camden; Henry M. Autrey, Vivian T. Deaton and Jenkins Jones, all of Sunny South; Oscar L. Autrey, Henry C. Boutwell and Charles E. Treaster, all of Pine Hill; Jimmie A. James and Willie Gay Williams, both of Furman; John Henry Privett and Fletcher E. Smith, both of Lower Peach Tree; Frank C. Brooks of Coy, Fred Battle of Gastonburg, John Butler of Snow Hill, Daniel Robinson of Prairie, Frank Stallworth of Bellview, John Watson and Wiley McMurphy Steen, both of Pine Apple; and Samuel C. Watford of Caledonia.

In the end, some of these soldiers are buried in Wilcox County, but others are not, and it’s up to us to remember their sacrifice. I’d like to hear from anyone in the reading audience with more information about the World War I casualties listed above. Also, if you know of any other soldiers from Wilcox County who were killed in World War I not mentioned above, please let me know and I will add them to the list.

100-year-old news highlights from The Wilcox Progressive Era


What follows are 100-year-old news excerpts from the Nov. 14, 1918 edition of The Wilcox Progressive Era newspaper in Camden, Ala.

When the citizenship of Camden arose on Monday morning they were greeted with the glorious news that Germany had “surrendered unconditionally” and the greatest war that have ever been was closed. Prayers went up in thankfulness to the Almighty that right had triumphed and this world would not be under the dominion of the warlords, but was safe for Democracy. Mothers, who had sons whose bones rest on French soil, gave vent to their feelings; and while their hearts were bursting with grief, their bosoms swelled with pride that they had given their lives in so great a cause. At 3:30 there was a spontaneous uprising of the citizens, who with the ringing of bells, blowing of whistles and many other devices for making a noise gave vent to their feelings. Patriotic speeches were made by Hons. E.W. Berry, J.M. Bonner, Lee McMillan and Solicitor J.F. Thompson. It would be impossible to describe the emotions of the crowd. Mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters shed tears of joy that they would soon be rejoined by their loved ones who are at the front, and the prayers of the entire crowd went up that such would be the case at an early date. There are no more patriotic people on earth than those of Camden and Wilcox County.

The name of Evans Autrey of Lamison is among those reported Monday as severely wounded, and Leslie W. Autrey is reported slightly wounded. Unless we are mistaken, this makes seven Wilcox heroes bearing the name of Autrey who have been reported in the casualty list.

The Progressive Era columns are a little “skimpy” this week on account of editors and typos being intoxicated with gladness distilled from the war news.

There were 10,555 bales of cotton, counting round as half bales, ginned in Wilcox County from the crop of 1918 prior to Oct. 18, 1918 as compared with 5,334 bales ginned to Oct. 18, 1917. – C.S. Dale, Agent.

One of the most welcome sounds that break the monotony of these still Sunday nights is the cry of “Mobile Register!” After an all-day wait for news, more than one reader awaits the coming of the Neville boys, who are always on the job, with grateful appreciation for their stickability. They are doing their part to keep the public posted. Hats off to them.

Rev. A.P. Majors of Chestnut paid us a pleasant call Tuesday and renewed his subscription to the Progressive Era.

The falling river on Monday made all crossings almost impossible, and resulted in delaying a good many citizens who were on their way to court here.

Mrs. Addie Belle Neville received a letter Tuesday night from her husband, Thomas Fleetwood Neville, stating that he had been badly wounded in battle on Sept. 30. He belongs to the 82nd Division which has been in the thickest of the fighting. The letter stated that at first he thought he would lose his leg but now had hopes of saving it.

Mr. Ken Partin brought some very fine specimens of sweet potatoes to this office last week, of the Jersey Sweet variety. These potatoes were so large it remains a mystery how he got them out of the ground, unless he had a double patented stump puller.

Mr. Willie Hayes Sessions has been transferred from Camp Oglethorpe, where he was stationed as guardsman, to an officers training camp near Anniston. Willie is making good.

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

100-year-old news highlights from The Evergreen Courant


What follows are 100-year-old news excerpts from the Nov. 13, 1918 edition of The Evergreen Courant newspaper in Conecuh County, Ala.

The war came to an end at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month.

The Courant suggests that a monument or shaft to commemorate the gallantry of Conecuh boys who gave up their lives during the war should be erected on Court Square. We believe the people of our country would gladly subscribe a sufficient amount to put a creditable memorial for our dead heroes. At the proper time we hope the good ladies will take the matters in charge.

J.P. Lambert Dead: Just as we go to press, the sad news reached The Courant of the sudden and unexpected death this afternoon of J.P. Lambert at his home at Jayvilla. He was found dead at his barn. He was a highly esteemed citizen and had many friends, who will learn with deep regret of his demise.

NOTICE: Greening Lodge No. 53 will have its regular communications next Thurs., Nov. 14, at 7:30 p.m. Members are requested to attend. Visiting Brethren cordially invited. By order of J.T. Amos, Worshipful Master; J.A. Smith, Secretary.

Sim Chitty, a well known citizen of Beat One, died several days ago, a victim of the flu.

Gen. J.B. Stanley, editor of The Greenville Advocate, was here Saturday and paid The Courant office a fraternal visit.

Evergreen People Celebrate Great War Victory: Evergreen people celebrated the great war victory Monday afternoon and night with such a demonstration as was never before witnessed in our community. The lid was off and everybody yelled themselves hoarse, discharged fireworks and firearms and made noise in every conceivable manner.
The people heard the glad news during the early hours of the morning, but having been fooled once before by a false report, they waited to see it in black and white in The Advertiser, and The Advertiser carried the storm in flaming headlines. This satisfied them and everybody was happy.
Business houses and offices were closed in the afternoon, and the first staring of the celebration began at the City School grounds, patriotic songs, the raising of Old Glory and short speeches by Rev. D.W. Haskew and Attorney E.C. Page, every utterance being received with cheering, and concluding with the burning of the “Kaiser’s Coffin” in a huge bonfire on the campus.
But this was not all. In the early part of the night, the revelry began in earnest. The blowing of whistles, the yelling and whooping, the rapid discharge of firearms and fireworks kept up till a late hour. Tuesday morning found the streets littered with empty shells and other evidences of the previous night’s fun and frolic. The people of Evergreen, young and old, will long remember Monday night’s demonstration. Everybody laughed and everybody was happy and the happy look and hearty laugh will not wear off.

Light Vote Polled in County: The Democratic nominees from governor down received 481 votes in the election on the 5th, according to the official tabulation made by the county board. There were 12 votes polled for the Republican candidate for governor and only six votes for the other Republican candidates for state offices. The Republican votes were at the following boxes: Evergreen, 1; Shreve, 5; Range,8; Brooklyn, 1; Owassa, 1; Lee, 1.

Monday, November 12, 2018

Today in History for Nov. 12, 2018


Nov. 12, 1729 – French explorer Louis Antoine de Bougainville was born in Paris, France.


Nov. 12, 1775 - Upon hearing of England’s rejection of the so-called Olive Branch Petition on this day, Abigail Adams wrote to her husband, John Adams, “Let us separate, they are unworthy to be our Brethren. Let us renounce them and instead of supplications as formerly for their prosperity and happiness, Let us beseech the almighty to blast their councils and bring to Nought all their devices.”

Nov. 12, 1813 - Sam Dale, Jeremiah Austill and James Smith became frontier heroes in a Creek War episode on the Alabama River known as “The Canoe Fight.” From their canoe, paddled by a black man named Caesar, the three Americans engaged a large canoe carrying nine Creek warriors near the mouth of Randon’s Creek on the Alabama River. As militiamen and Indians watched from opposite sides of the river, Dale, Austill, and Smith killed the nine warriors in hand-to-hand combat. (Other sources say this event occurred on Jan. 12, 1813.)

Nov. 12, 1815 – Feminist Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born in Johnstown, New York.

Nov. 12-13, 1833 – In a spectacle seen across the Southeast, a fantastic meteor shower caused this night to be known as “the night stars fell on Alabama.” The shower created such great excitement across the state that it became a part of Alabama folklore and for years was used to date events. A century later it inspired a song and book, and in 2002 the state put the phrase "Stars Fell on Alabama" on its license plates.

Nov. 12, 1840 – French sculptor Auguste Rodin was born in Paris.

Nov. 12, 1861 – During the Civil War, Federal reconnaissance to Pohick Church and Occoquan Creek in Virginia began.

Nov. 12, 1861 – During the Civil War, a skirmish was fought on Laurel Creek, Cotton Hill in West Virginia.

Nov. 12, 1862 – During the Civil War, the Federal courier station on Stone’s River, Tenn. was captured, and a skirmish was fought near Suffolk, Va.

Nov. 12, 1863 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Roseville, Ark.; at Greenleaf Prairie in the Indian Territory; at Corinth, Miss.; and near Cumberland Gap, Tenn. Federal operations also began about Saint Martinsville in the Bayou Tech country of Louisiana.

Nov. 12, 1864 - Union General William T. Sherman ordered the business district of Atlanta destroyed before he embarked on his famous March to the Sea. He had captured Atlanta in early September 1864, and he ordered a systematic destruction of the city to prevent Confederates from recovering anything once the Yankees abandoned it. By one estimate, nearly 40 percent of the city was ruined.

Nov. 12, 1864 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought near Centreville, Mo.; near Cedar Creek, Newtown (or Middletown,) and Nineveh in Virginia; and with Indians at Ash Creek near Fort Larned, Kansas.

Nov. 12, 1867 - After more than a decade of ineffective military campaigns and infamous atrocities, a conference began at Fort Laramie to discuss alternative solutions to the “Indian problem” and to initiate peace negotiations with the Sioux.

Nov. 12, 1889 – DeWitt Wallace, the founder of “Reader’s Digest,” was born in St. Paul, Minn.

Nov. 12, 1892 - William "Pudge" Heffelfinger became the first professional football player on record, participating in his first paid game for the Allegheny Athletic Association.

Nov. 12, 1895 - Five days after a huge fire on Nov. 7, fire destroyed every business and house on the west side of the railroad tracks in Evergreen, Ala.

Nov. 12, 1895 – “Quite a sensation” occurred when Top Moseley and Judge Stallworth got into an altercation in Monroeville, Ala. Moseley was said to have been interfering with an employee of Stallworth’s, and Stallworth ordered him off his property. Moseley and Stallworth exchanged words, and Stallworth hit Moseley with his cane. Moseley seized the cane and hit Stallworth twice in the face before fleeing the scene. A “crowd of boys” pursued Moseley and several shots were fired, but the chase was abandoned after Moseley “took to the woods.”

Nov. 12, 1912 – Dr. Woodrow Wilson Eddins born in Peterman, Ala. He went on to deliver over 9,000 babies, more than the entire population of Monroeville today.

Nov. 12, 1912 – The frozen bodies of Robert Scott and his men were found on the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica.

Nov. 12, 1914 – After an illness of about two weeks, former Conecuh County Sheriff Wiley W. Pridgen, 49, passed away in Evergreen, Ala. Pridgen, who was born on July 21, 1865, moved to Evergreen from Brewton in 1896 and was a partner in the stock and livery business with Walter Lee. A native of Texas, who came to Alabama 25 years before his death, Pridgen was later elected Conecuh County Sheriff, and he was an active member of the local Knights of Pythias lodge. His remains were shipped by train to Thomaston, Texas for burial, with his stepfather A.W. Eatman and Walter Lee serving as escorts. He was buried in Thomaston Community Cemetery in Thomaston in DeWitt County, Texas.

Nov. 12, 1914 – Mrs. W.C. Brantley passed away at her home near Repton, Ala. and was buried at Oak Grove Cemetery the next day.

Nov. 12, 1914 – The four-act comedy, “Hazel Adams,” was performed at Monroe County High School in Monroeville, Ala., starting at 8 p.m., a fundraiser for the school’s Domestic Science Department.

Nov. 12, 1915 – “The Master Hand,” starring Nat Godwin, was scheduled to be shown at the Arcade Theatre in Evergreen, Ala.

Nov. 12, 1915 – Philosopher and literary critic Roland Barthes was born in Cherbourg, France.

Nov. 12, 1917 - A movie version of Alabama author Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews' book “The Courage of the Commonplace” was released.

Nov. 12, 1918 - One day after an armistice ended World War I, the Allied fleet passed through the Dardanelles, the narrow strait running between Europe and Asia that had in 1915 been the site of a disastrous Allied naval operation.

Nov. 12, 1920 - Judge Keneshaw Mountain Landis was elected the first commissioner of the American and National Baseball Leagues.

Nov. 12, 1921 – A fiddler’s convention was held in Paul, Ala.

Nov. 12, 1923 – English archaeologist and explorer Ian Graham was born in Campsea Ashe, a village in the East Anglia county of Suffolk, England.

Nov. 12, 1929 – Children’s novelist Michael Ende, best known for his 1979 book “The Neverending Story,” was born in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

Nov. 12, 1932 – Ed Morrow, 30, was found dead from a shotgun wound near Heath’s Mill on the Farnham Plantation near Belleville, Ala. Deputy Sheriff W.A. Moore, Coroner L.B. Chapman and a coroner’s jury composed of C.A. Hart, C.E. Mills, Howard Landon, H.J. Owens, M.L. Sheffield and E. Lundy went to the scene, investigated and determined that his death was the result of a “gunshot wound inflicted by a person and persons unknown.” Moore went on to arrest Elisha Brown, Lewis King and Vester Daily in connection with Morrow’s death.

Nov. 12, 1933 - In Philadelphia, the first Sunday football game was played.

Nov. 12, 1933 – Hugh Gray took the first known photos alleged to be of the Loch Ness Monster. Gray was walking along the shore of Loch Ness when he saw an "object of considerable dimensions, making a big splash with spray on the surface of the Loch."  He had his camera with him, and captured what some believe to be the first photographic evidence of the Loch Ness Monster. Others have dismissed the image as a distortion of a dog swimming through the water.

Nov. 12, 1944 – Sportscaster Al Michaels was born in Brooklyn, N.Y.

Nov. 12, 1945 – Singer and musician Neil Young was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Nov. 12, 1945 – Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and short-story writer Tracy Kidder was born in New York City.

Nov. 12, 1953 - The National Football League policy of blacking out home games was upheld by Judge Allan K. Grim of the U.S. District Court in Philadelphia.

Nov. 12, 1954 – Ellis Island formally closed its doors after processing more than 12 million immigrants to the United States in its more than a half century of service.

Nov. 12, 1955 – Novelist Katharine Weber was born in New York City.

Nov. 12, 1956 – Prof. George Singer, famous hypnotist, conducted a two-hour show on hypnotism at the Evergreen City School Auditorium in Evergreen, Ala. The show was sponsored by the Evergreen Jaycees.

Nov. 12, 1958 – A team of rock climbers led by Warren Harding completed the first ascent of The Nose on El Capitan in Yosemite Valley.

Nov. 12, 1959 – The Monroe Journal reported that the “strange disappearance” of the Fred Hayles family of Uriah, Ala. remained unsolved after a month-long investigation covering several states had failed to produce any evidence as to their whereabouts. The family had been missing from their home since Oct. 10, and members of the missing family included Hayles, who was a farmer, his wife, four children his father.

Nov. 12, 1964 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the Evergreen Jaycees had named Evergreen High School’s Alvin Dees as Player of the Week for his performance in the Nov. 6 Evergreen-T.R. Miller game. Dees, a senior tackle and linebacker, received the award earlier in the season after Evergreen’s game against Greenville. Dees was named to the Birmingham Post-Herald’s All State football team in 1963.

Nov. 12, 1964 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Cadet 2nd Lt. David Hyde Jr., the son of Mr. D.T. Hyde of Evergreen, Ala., had been appointed Platoon Leader in Co. A by Col. John W. Paddock, Professor of Military Science at the University of Alabama’s Army ROTC Cadet Brigade. In addition to his activities in the Cadet Brigade, Cadet Hyde had been a member of the ROTC Rifle Team from 1962-1964. Hyde was a graduate of Evergreen High School in Evergreen, Ala.

Nov. 12, 1965 – Monroe County High School, under head coach Ronnie Dees, beat Frisco City High School, 38-0, in Frisco City in the season finale for both teams. The win also gave MCHS the county championship with wins over all three of the other county teams and put the Tigers record at 8-1-1. Standout MCHS players in that game included Frank McCreary, Randy McDonald, Tommy McMillon, Mike Segers and Larry Wiggins. Standout Frisco players included Pat Boothe, Donnie Griffey, Wayne Ikner, Mike Johns, Jim Kelly and Donnie Wiggins.

Nov. 12, 1967 - The Detroit Lions set a National Football League record when they fumbled the ball 11 times. They only lost possession five of the 11 times.

Nov. 12, 1969 – During the Vietnam War, independent investigative journalist Seymour Hersh broke the story of the My Lai Massacre.

Nov. 12, 1969 - In Washington, D.C., the federal government began to assemble 9,000 troops to assist the police and National Guard with massive protests and demonstrations scheduled for November 14-15.

Nov. 12, 1970 - Alabama author Michelle Richmond was born in Demopolis, Ala.

Nov. 12, 1971 – During the Vietnam War, as part of Vietnamization, U.S. President Richard Nixon set Feb. 1, 1972 as the deadline for the removal of another 45,000 American troops from Vietnam.

Nov. 12, 1972 - Don Shula, coach of the Miami Dolphins, became the first NFL head coach to win 100 regular season games in 10 seasons.

Nov. 12, 1976 – Vampire novelist Richelle Mead was born in Michigan.

Nov. 12, 1986 – Katie Sue Burt, the widow of the late Conecuh County Commission Chairman David L. Burt, who passed away on Nov. 7, 1986, took the oath of office as Chairman of the Conecuh County Commission shortly after 9 a.m. in the commission meeting room. The oath of office was administered by Circuit Judge Robert E.L. Key in the presence of the members of the commission, members of the Burt family and friends.

Nov. 12, 1993 – Episode No. 9 of “The X-Files” – entitled “Space” – aired for the first time.

Nov. 12, 1994 – Heather Watson was named Conecuh County’s Junior Miss during the county’s annual Junior Miss program at Ed Reid State Technical College in Evergreen, Ala. Other contestants that year included Rachel Bohannon, Kelly Booker, Amanda Chavers, Kristie Ivey, Ruby Lett, Carmon Salter and Monica Williams.

Nov. 12, 1997 - The UN Security Council imposed new sanctions on Iraq for constraints being placed on UN arms inspectors.

Nov. 12, 2002 - Stan Lee filed a lawsuit against Marvel Entertainment Inc. that claimed the company had cheated him out of millions of dollars in movie profits related to the 2002 movie "Spider-Man." Lee was the creator of Spider-Man, the Incredible Hulk and Daredevil.

Nov. 12, 2003 – In Nasiriyah, Iraq, at least 23 people, among them the first Italian casualties of the 2003 invasion of Iraq, were killed in a suicide bomb attack on an Italian police base.


Nov. 12, 2011 - Burnt Corn native Marcus Lee, his two brothers and a cousin had what Lee believed to be their first encounter with a Bigfoot-type creature in the woods across from his grandmother’s home on Conecuh County Road 15, between Lett Hope Road and New Hope AME Zion Church, about three miles southeast of Burnt Corn. They, along with two dogs, were out coon hunting on this cold night, under a full moon, around 11 p.m. when they heard what Lee described as two loud “clacks” as if someone was banging two rocks together. Next, the ensuing silence was broken by what sounded like something stomping or hitting the ground twice in the woods ahead of the hunters. Next, they heard something large circling through the woods around their group, smashing through the trees, which prompted the hunters to make their way out of the woods.