Monday, June 26, 2017

The Evergreen Courant's Sports Flashback for June 26, 2017

Cliff Harper
54 YEARS AGO
JUNE 27, 1963

Sr. League Results: The Tigers downed the Indians, 9-5, Monday night to strengthen their grip on first place. The winners now boast a 5-0 slate.
A triple by Jerry Johnson was the big hit of the Tigers’ seven-run first inning.
Singles by Clint Ward, Jimmy Warren and Paul Deason helped put three tallies across the plate for the losers in the third.
Wayne Pate was the winner on the hill although he was relieved in the fourth by Bubba Faulkner. Bill Snowden and Knud Nielsen were the Indian moundsmen with Snowden taking the loss.
Braves vs. Pirates: The Braves whipped the Pirates, 5-2, Monday night to take over second place in the Senior League pennant race. The Braves record is now 3-2 while the Bucs have a 2-3 mark.
The Braves scored three runs in the first frame on only one hit, a single by Terry Coleman.
Three errors in the Brave infield gave the losers two runs in the fourth.
Grover Jackson took the hill win, with Johnny Brown pitching the last inning for the victors. Chastain was the loser although Steve Baggett took over after two outs in the first inning.
Brave shortstop Terry Coleman was injured when struck in the eye by a throw in the fourth inning. He was taken to the Conecuh County Hospital for examination.
The Tigers vs. Pirates: The Tigers stretched their winning string to four Thursday night with a 4-1 win over the Pirates. Bubba Faulkner was the winning hurler while Steve Baggett was tagged with the loss.

69 YEARS AGO
JUNE 24, 1948

Cliff Harper Resigns EHS Post To Become AHSAA’s First Full Time Secretary: J. Cliff Harper resigned his post as principal of Evergreen High School last week to accept the position of full time secretary of the Alabama High School Athletic Association. Mr. Harper will assume his new duties on July 1 when he relieves Sellers Strough who has served in a part time capacity as secretary for 25 years.
This is a big step forward for the Alabama High School Athletic Association. This full time post has long been needed to bring the state’s high school sports organization up to par with other states such as Texas, Georgia and New York.
Mr. Harper and his staff of workers will have offices in Montgomery. Mr. Strough will work with Harper for the first month acquainting him with his new duties.
Mr. and Mrs. Harper and Mr. and Mrs. Strough of Birmingham are attending the national meeting of the Executive Secretaries of the State Athletic Associations in Piquot Lake, Min. They will be there for a week during which time rules, regulations, etc. for the next year will be discussed and voted on.
Mr. Harper has served as principal at Evergreen High School for the past two years. He is a native of Pineapple, Ala. and earned his A.B. at Birmingham Southern where he played end on the football team. After having coached two years at Sardis High School, Harper earned his M.S. at Auburn in 1939. He then served as principal and coach at Spring Garden High for four years and at Georgiana for one year before entering the Army.
Mr. Harper entered the Army as a private and was separated from the service as a captain. While in the Army, he served as a director of athletics and physical training.
Harper’s record at Evergreen High School has been outstanding. A firm believer in a strong athletic and physical training program, he organized an excellent intra-mural program at Evergreen High. He also set up and directed a summer recreation program for the City of Evergreen.
No one in the state has worked harder as an individual to strengthen the state athletic association than Cliff Harper. He long ago saw the need for a full time secretary and has urged the addition of this office. It is fitting that one of his qualifications and experience should become the first to fill the office.

Brewton Pro Baseball Club Will Hold Evergreen Night: Officials of the Brewton Millers entry in the professional Class D Alabama State League, announced this week that they would hold an “Evergreen Night” on Wed., July 7. Plans have been completed to reserve around half of the seats for Evergreen fans.
Businessmen in Brewton and Evergreen have purchased several hundred tickets to the game and will distribute them in Evergreen. Half the grandstand and half the bleachers will be roped off for Evergreen fans and a large attendance is expected to represent the city.
The Millers will play the Greenville Pirates in the game that will feature the events of “Evergreen Night.” Game time will be 7:30.

Greenies Play Brewton Here Sunday At Three: The Evergreen Greenies will play Brewton here Sunday in a Tri-County Baseball League game. This is a change in schedule. Evergreen originally would have played in Brewton Sunday and a home game here next Thursday. To avoid conflict with the professional Millers, the games were changed. Evergreen will play Brewton in Brewton next Wednesday night.
The Greenies play Booneville at McCullough today. Their game here Sunday was rained out.
The game here Sunday will be a crucial one. Brewton is the only team in the loop that has defeated Evergreen this season. Game time is three o’clock, place, Brooks Stadium Sunday afternoon.

84 YEARS AGO
JUNE 29, 1933

Evergreen Increases Lead In Pennant Race: With Doc Jones registering his second shutout in a row, the Evergreen baseball club took Greenville into camp on the Butler countians’ home lot Sunday afternoon, 2-0, to give them a four-game lead over the second-place Crenshaw County team from Luverne. The locals had defeated Ft. Deposit Thursday in both ends of a double bill, the second game of which Jones pitched for his initial scoreless effort.
Evergreen’s fighting Irishmen went out for blood in the Thursday doubleheader, which was transferred here from Ft. Deposit so that a protested game could be replayed, and they got it in copious measures. The first game was won easily behind the five-hit hurling of Skin Hyde, by a score of 16-2, while the second affray was a close and tightly played affair, resulting in a score of 4-0, Doc Jones hurling.
The Greenville affair Sunday was nip and tuck with Jones getting the call when Manager Murphy decided the long boy was ready to go after his great work Tuesday. Drawing Hester, one of the best in the league, as his opponent, Jones knew he had to work hard if he won the ball game, and he promptly went to work.
(Other players on Evergreen’s team that season included Skeeter Amos, Archie Barfield, Gaston, Joe Hagood, Hanna, Tom Kendall, Tom Melton and Moorer.)

99 YEARS AGO
JUNE 26, 1918

D.L. Long left here (Castleberry) the first of the week on a fishing trip on the Yellow River in Florida.

114 YEARS AGO
JUNE 24, 1903

The game of ball between Brewton and Evergreen played here on Friday was one of considerable local interest, though there was ragged playing on each side, neither of the teams having had very much practice. For the first six innings, it looked as if the game would result in a victory for Evergreen, but some bad playing on the infield by Evergreen lost the game to Brewton. The game ended in a score of nine to six in Brewton’s favor. The second game will be played in Brewton on Friday next.

Robert Powell and wife of Montgomery, after spending several days fishing here (Garland), have returned home.

Today in History for June 26, 2017

Indian Springs Baptist Church
June 26, 1284 - It was said that the Pied Piper of Hamelin, Germany lured 130 children out of town, and they were never seen again.


June 26, 1541 - Spanish explorer and politician Francisco Pizarro, who was between 65 and 70 years old, was assassintated while eating dinner at his palace in Lima by the son of his former companion and later antagonist, Diego Almagro the younger. Almagro is later caught and executed. Pizarro was the governor of Peru and conqueror of the Inca civilization.

June 26, 1776 - John Adams, who would go on to become the second President of the United States of America, wrote a letter to his wife Abigail in which he complained that the Congress was giving him "more business than I am qualified for, and more than, I fear, that I can go through, with safety to my health."

June 26, 1784 - Delaware Patriot Caesar Rodney passed away at the age of 55 in Kent County, Delaware. Rodney is best remembered for his overnight ride from Dover, Delaware to Philadelphia, Pa. to cast the deciding vote for the Declaration of Independence in the Continental Congress on July 2, 1776. The image of Rodney on horseback riding for Philadelphia appears on the Delaware quarter, issued in 1999.

June 26, 1804 - The Lewis and Clark Expedition reached the mouth of the Kansas River after completing a westward trek of nearly 400 river miles.

June 26, 1819 – Union General Abner Doubleday was born in Ballston Spa, N.Y. He fired the first shot in defense of Fort Sumter, the opening battle of the war, and had a pivotal role in the early fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg. Doubleday has been historically credited with inventing baseball, although this appears to be untrue.

June 26, 1861 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Frankfort and Patterson's Creek, West Virginia.

June 26, 1862 - At the Battle of Mechanicsville, Va., Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia struck Union General George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac, beginning the Seven Days' Battles. This was Lee’s first battle as commander of the army. McClellan eventually withdrew back toward Washington after both sides suffered heavy losses. Lee lost 1,475 men; Union losses were only 361.

June 26, 1862 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Cherry Grove, Mo.; and at Meadow Bridge, Hanover Court House, and Atlee's Station, Virginia.

June 26, 1863 – During the Civil War, Jubal Early and his Confederate forces moved through Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on the way toward York.

June 26, 1863 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; at Beech Grove, Tennessee; and at Messinger's Ferry, Mississippi.

June 26, 1863 – During the Civil War, the siege at Vicksburg, Miss. entered Day 39.

June 26, 1864 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought near Clarendon, Arkansas; and at Smithfield and Springfield, West Virginia. An affair also occurred near Sedina, Missouri.

June 26, 1879 – The Evergreen Star newspaper reported that the Conecuh Guards, Co. E, participated in the following named battles and skirmishes: First Battle Manassas, Va.; York Town, Elthems Landing, Seven Pines, Gaines Farm, Malvern Hill, Second Battle Manassas, Leesburg or Chantilla, Va.; South South Mountain, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Suffolk, Gettysburg, Hagerstown, Falling Waters, Manassas Gap, Thornton Creek, Chickamauga, Raccoon Mountain, Lookout Mountain, Knoxville, Dandridge, Strawberry Plains, Wilderness, Spotsylvania Court House, Crutchfield Farm, North Ann Bridge, Charles City Road, Williamsburg Road, Second Battle Cold Harbor, Deep Bottom, Fuzzles Mill, skirmish near Bermuda Hundred, Petersburg, Fort Gilmore, Fort Harrison, battle Darbytown, Darbytown Road, Williamsburg Road, McKinzie House, Petersburg, Amelia Court House, Burkville Junction, Farmville and Appomattox. (The list was furnished to the newspaper by Col. P.D. Bowles.)

June 26, 1891 - Alabama author Octavus Roy Cohen was born in Charleston, S.C.

June 26, 1892 – Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Pearl Buck was born in Hillsboro, W.V. Her most famous novel, “The Good Earth,” was published in 1931.

June 26, 1896 - Elder Irving L. Pratt and his colleagues, two Mormon missionaries of Provo, Utah, held services in the Monroe County Courthouse on this Friday night.

June 26, 1896 - The Board of Trustees of the Perdue Hill High School held a meeting on this Friday and unanimously elected Mr. R.E. Gordon of Camden as principal for the ensuing term. Gordon had been, for two years past, principal of the Ackerville Academy in Wilcox County and came highly recommended.

June 26, 1898 – Blues musician Big Bill Broonzy was born in Scott, Miss. (Some sources say he was born in Lake Dick, Ark. and in 1893.)

June 26, 1900 - A commission that included Dr. Walter Reed began the fight against the deadly disease yellow fever.

June 26, 1905 – The cases against the boys who were indicted by the grand jury for playing ball in Camden on Sunday came before the Wilcox County Court, and the cases were nol prossed on the promise that they would no longer play ball on Sunday.

June 26, 1912 – Confederate soldier Capt. James W. Darby of Garland, Ala. passed away. He was about 73 years old. Born on Jan. 25, 1840, he is buried in the Garland Cemetery in Butler County, Ala.

June 26, 1912 – The Evergreen Courant reported that W.W. Pridgen and Walter Lee had attended the Republican Convention in Chicago the week before and that week they were at the Democratic Convention in Baltimore. The Courant also reported that Judge Dean, C.P. Deming, W.M. Newton and J.F. Irwin were in Baltimore “looking on” at the Democratic National Convention.

June 26, 1912 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Wm. Bragg, a prominent banker of Ft. Deposit, was a guest of his brother, John Bragg, several days during the previous week.

June 26, 1914 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the thermometer topped 106 degrees in Evergreen, Ala., making it “the hottest day known in Evergreen for many years. The temperature for four days previous ranged from 102 to 105. The weather bureau states it a fact that this has been the hottest June since 1881.”

June 26, 1915 – On this Saturday afternoon John Salter and Robert Watkins made a full confession to the brutal murder of Martha Lassiter, the attempted murder of Wiley House and the robbery and burning of House’s residence near Burnt Corn on June 23, 2015. Also on this afternoon, Sheriff Williams and several deputies, as a precaution, transferred Salter and Watkins to the Montgomery County Jail by automobile.

June 26, 1915 – During a baseball game on this Saturday afternoon at Jeddo, J.C. Kyle was “hit on the side of his face by a pitched ball,” resulting in a fractured jawbone. He was taken to Dr. G.H. Harper at Uriah for treatment.

June 26, 1916 - The Chicago White Sox and the Cleveland Indians appeared in a game with numbers on their sleeves. The event marked the first time that players were identified by numbers that corresponded to the scoreboard.

June 26, 1916 – Children’s book author Walter Farley was bon in Syracuse, N.Y. He is best known for his 1941 book, “The Black Stallion.”

June 26, 1917 – The first 14,000 U.S. infantry troops begin arriving in France at the port of Saint Nazaire during World War I.

June 26, 1918 – The Evergreen Courant reported that D.L. Long left Castleberry the first of that week to go on a fishing trip on the Yellow River in Florida.

June 26, 1918 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the many friends of Mrs. L.D. King sympathized sincerely with her in the death of her father, the Hon. W.S. Watson, who passed away at his home in Greenville several days before. He had for several years past been clerk of the circuit court of Butler County and had previously served one term as sheriff.

June 26, 1918 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the local freight trains were again making their night stop-over in Castleberry.

June 26, 1923 - Alabama author Alfred Maund was born in Jennings, La.

June 26, 1928 - Alabama author Amelie Rives's play “Say When” opened on Broadway.

June 26, 1928 - Fire broke out in the walls of the Electrick Maid Bakery in Evergreen about 9:30 o’clock on this Tuesday morning but quick work on the part of the fire department checked it before much damage was done.

June 26, 1930 – The Monroe Journal reported that the following officers had been elected to serve the Alabama Lodge No. 3 for the ensuring Masonic year: A.B. Coxwell, Worshipful Master; H.A. Baggett, Senior Warden; W.L. Holloway, Junior Warden; J.M. Sowell, Senior Deacon; Fred Sheffield, Junior Deacon; L.L. Dees, Secretary; L.L. Hendrix, Treasurer; J.F. Davis, Tyler.

June 26, 1932 – Camden native Tom “Sut” Jenkins appeared in his final Major League game, pinching hitting for the St. Louis Browns in a 10-5 road loss to the Cleveland Indians in which Jenkins went 1-for-1 at the plate.

June 26, 1934 - Alabama author Carl Carmer's book “Stars Fell on Alabama” was published.

June 26, 1938 - Lonney Frey of the Cincinnati Reds had eight hits in a doubleheader split with the Philadelphia Phillies.

June 26, 1939 - M.E. Skinner brought the first open cotton boll of the season to The Monroe Journal office on this Monday from his farm north of Monroe Station.

June 26, 1944 - The New York Giants, Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Yankees played against each other in a six-inning contest in a war bonds fund-raiser. Over 50,000 people watched the game. The final score was Dodgers 5, Yankees 1 and the Giants 0.

June 26, 1944 – The Battle of Osuchy in Osuchy, Poland, one of the largest battles between Nazi Germany and Polish resistance forces, ended with the defeat of the latter.

June 26, 1946 - A movie version of Alabama author Lillian Hellman's play “The Searching Wind” was released.

June 26, 1946 – German SS officer Max Kögel committed suicide by hanging in his prison cell in Schwabach, West Germany.

June 26, 1948 – Shirley Jackson's short story “The Lottery” was published in The New Yorker magazine.

June 26, 1948 - Funeral services were held at the Oak Grove Church near Repton on this Saturday afternoon for Grady H. Johnson who was killed in action in North Africa in March 1943. He was buried with military honors under the direction of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the National Guard.

June 26, 1952 – Evergreen’s Junior American Legion baseball team was scheduled to play a rematch against Andalusia at Brooks Stadium in Evergreen, Ala. on this Thursday afternoon. Two days before, Andalusia beat Evergreen, 8-7, in Andalusia.

June 26, 1952 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the “sweltering weather” that had gripped Conecuh County, Ala. for the previous two weeks looked to continue with little relief in sight. Conecuh County had received scattered showers during this time, but there had been no “general rains” thus far in June. Virtually every day during this time, the temperature had “soared into the upper nineties” with the high reaching 100 degrees on June 15.

June 26-27, 1952 – “A Streetcar Named Desire,” starring Marlon Brando and Vivien Lee, was scheduled to be shown at The Pix Theater in Evergreen, Ala.

June 26, 1959 – Swedish boxer Ingemar Johansson became world champion of heavy weight boxing, by defeating american Floyd Patterson on technical knockout after two minutes and three seconds in the third round at Yankee Stadium.

June 26, 1961 - A Kuwaiti vote opposed Iraq's annexation plans.

June 26, 1962 - Earl Wilson of the Boston Red Sox pitched a 2-0 no-hitter against the Los Angeles Angels. Wilson also hit a home run.

June 26, 1965 - Gen. William Westmoreland, senior U.S. military commander in Vietnam, was given formal authority to commit American troops to battle when he decided they were necessary “to strengthen the relative position of the GVN [Government of Vietnam] forces.” This authorization permitted Westmoreland to put his forces on the offensive. Heretofore, U.S. combat forces had been restricted to protecting U.S. airbases and other facilities.

June 26, 1968 – Pro Football Hall of Fame tight end Shannon Sharpe was born in Chicago, Ill. He went on to play for Savannah State, the Denver Broncos and the Baltimore Ravens. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

June 26, 1969 – The Monroe Journal reported that Mr. and Mrs. Bill Stewart and son, David, visited Steve Stewart in Augusta, Ga. over the previous weekend.

June 26-July 6, 1969 - The 26th Annual Beulah Camp Meeting was scheduled to be held at the camp grounds near Excel.

June 26, 1969 – The Monroe Journal reported that Marine Private First Class Earnest R. Talbert, son of Mr. and Mrs. Elbert Talbert of Route 1, Beatrice, was serving with the Third Battalion, Fourth Marine Regiment, Third Marine Division, Vietnam. The battalion had been conducting sweep and clear operations just south of the Demilitarized Zone.

June 26, 1970 - Frank Robinson of the Baltimore Orioles hit two grand slams against the Washington Senators in a 12-2 win.

June 26, 1971 - The U.S. Justice Department issued a warrant for Daniel Ellsberg, accusing him of giving away the “Pentagon Papers.”

June 26, 1972 - The shift of fighter-bomber squadrons, involving up to 150 U.S. planes and more than 2,000 pilots from Da Nang, to bases in Thailand was completed. The shift was necessitated by the pending withdrawal of the U.S. infantry brigade that provided security for flyers at Da Nang. The departure of the U.S. unit was part of President Richard Nixon’s Vietnamization program that he had instituted in June 1969. Under this program, the responsibility for the war was to be gradually transferred to the South Vietnamese so U.S. forces could be withdrawn.

June 26, 1974 - Supermarket scanning of UPC codes began with a pack of chewing gum in Troy, Ohio. The first scan was made at a Marsh’s Supermarket in Troy, Ohio, which had agreed to serve as a test facility for the new technology, and the first item scanned was a pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit Gum. That pack of gum is on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.
  
June 26, 1976 - Shortstop Toby Harrah of the Texas Rangers played an entire doubleheader without handling a batted ball from the Chicago White Sox.

June 26, 1976 – NFL quarterback Chad Pennington was born in Knoxville, Tenn. He went on to play for Marshall, the New York Jets and the Miami Dolphins.

June 26, 1981 - At this Friday’s Monroe County Board of Education meeting, board president Edgar Melton presented a plaque and a resolution to former schools superintendent James R. Allen, who became president of Patrick Henry State Junior College on April 1, 1981 after serving as superintendent since Nov. 15, 1972. The resolution cited Allen for initiating “innovative and progressive programs while supporting established and proved programs to improve the overall educational processes” and handling funds allocated to the board “wisely and with skill to benefit all facets of the educational areas of the county.”

June 26, 1982 – The Lyeffion Saddle Club was scheduled to hold a horseshow on this Saturday starting at 5 p.m.

June 26, 1982 – A ladies slow pitch softball tournament, sponsored by the China Ladies Softball Club, was scheduled to be held on this Saturday at Evergreen Municipal Park in Evergreen, Ala.

June 26, 1984 - Kerney Windham, who was Chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Natural Resources Branch in Mobile, announced on this Tuesday that the Corps would begin accepting bids for construction of a proposed boat ramp to be built near the Claiborne Lock and Dam in August of this year. The ramp was to be built about a mile below the dam on the east bank, according to Windham.

June 26, 1985 - Wilbur Snapp was ejected after playing "Three Blind Mice" during a baseball game. The incident followed a call made by umpire Keith O'Connor.

June 26, 1987 – “Full Metal Jacket,” a movie version of Alabama author Gustav Hasford's book “The Short-Timers,” was released.

June 26, 1993 – National Baseball Hall of Fame catcher Roy Campanella passed away at the age of 71 in Woodland Hills, Calif. He played his entire career (1948-1957) for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1969.

June 26, 1993 – In retaliation for an Iraqi plot to assassinate former U.S. President George Bush during his April visit to Kuwait, President Bill Clinton ordered U.S. warships to fire Tomahawk cruise missiles at Iraqi intelligence headquarters in downtown Baghdad.

June 26, 1997 – Hillcrest High School’s band boosters were scheduled to hold a reception in the school cafetorium in Evergreen, Ala. on this Thursday at 6 p.m. to introduce and welcome the school’s new band director, Christal Carter.

June 26, 1997 – The first book in the Harry Potter series, “Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone,” was published in Britain.

June 26, 1997 – Pro Football Hall of Fame and former University of Alabama split end Don Hutson passed away at the age of 84 in Rancho Mirage, Calif. After college, he played his entire pro career (1933-1945) for the Green Bay Pakers and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1963.

June 26, 1998 – The Oak Hill Historic District in Oak Hill in Wilcox County, Ala. was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The district is roughly centered on the intersection of State Highway 10 and State Highway 21. It contains 6,750 acres, 56 buildings and seven structures.

June 26, 1998 – The classic Civil War-era blockbuster “Gone with the Wind,” originally released in 1939, is re-released in U.S. theaters by New Line Pictures.

June 26, 1999 - Sammy Sosa of the Chicago White Sox hit his 300th career home run.

June 26, 1999 - Cal Ripken of the Baltimore Orioles got his 995th extra base hit.

June 26, 2000 - Alex Cabrera of the Arizona Diamondbacks hit a two-run home run in his first major league at-bat.

June 26, 2000 – Pope John Paul II revealed the third secret of Fátima.

June 26, 2003 – Indian Springs Baptist Church at McWilliams, near Beatrice, in Monroe County, Ala. was listed on Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage.

June 26, 2003 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Cody Lowery, the son of John and Linda Blackmon, had recently represented Conecuh County at the 66th annual American Legion Alabama Boys State. While attending Boys State, Lowery was elected to the House of Representatives. He was an upcoming senior at Sparta Academy.

June 26, 2005 - Paulus van der Sloot and Steve Gregory Croes were ordered to be released from jail after their arrests in connection with the disappearance of Natalee Holloway, 18, of Mountain Brook, Ala.

June 26, 2008 – A suicide bomber dressed as an Iraqi policeman detonated an explosive vest, killing 25 people.

June 26, 2008 - Out-going Conecuh County Junior High School principal Patsy Smith was recognized by the state legislature for her outstanding career during a special ceremony on this Thursday afternoon at the Castleberry school.

Today in History for June 25, 2017

Old Claiborne-Murphy Bridge
June 25, 1745 – Future South Carolina Patriot, physician and U.S. Treasurer Thomas Tudor Tucker was born in Port Royal, Bermuda.


June 25, 1788 – Virginia became the tenth state to ratify the United States Constitution.

June 25, 1799 – Scottish-English botanist and explorer David Douglas was born in Scone, Perth and Kinross, Scotland. He worked as a gardener, and explored the Scottish Highlands, North America, and Hawaii, where he died under mysterious circumstances while climbing Mauna Kea at the age of 35 in 1834.

June 25, 1813 – More than 300 hostile Creeks, under Prophet Francis, were camped at the Holy Ground in present-day Alabama.

June 25, 1819 – Alabama Masonic Lodge No. 51 (now No. 3 in Monroeville) was chartered by the Grand Lodge of South Carolina at its original location in Claiborne, Ala.

June 25, 1862 – Hilliard’s Legion was organized at Montgomery, Ala. and consisted of five battalions. Fourth Battalion was commanded by major John D. McLennan of Barbour County. The Legion proceeded to East Tennessee, nearly 3,000 strong, under its commander, Col. Hilliard of Montgomery. Proceeding to Cumberland Gap, it was part of the force that besieged that position.

June 25, 1862 – During the Civil War, the first day of the Seven Days' campaign began with fighting at Oak Grove, Va. Skirmishes were also fought at La Fayette Station, Tenn. and at Yellville, Ark.

June 25, 1863 – During the Civil War, Confederates captured Federal outposts at Port Hudson, La.

June 25, 1863 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought near McConnellsburg, Pa.; at Beech Grove, Guy's Gap and Fosterville in Tennessee; and near Loup Creek, West Virginia.

June 25, 1863 – During the Civil War, on Day 38 of the Vicksburg, Mississippi siege, Union soldiers tried to exploit an explosion under the Confederate entrenchments, but Confederates repulsed the attack.

June 25, 1864 – Union troops from Pennsylvania begin tunneling toward the Rebels at Petersburg, Va. in order to blow a hole in the Confederate lines and end the stalemate. The brainchild of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Pleasants, the plan called for the men of his regiment, the 48th Pennsylvania – mostly miners from Pennsylvania’s anthracite coal region – to construct a 500-foot tunnel to the Confederate line, fill it with powder, and blow a gap in the fortifications. The explosion was set off on July 30, and a huge gap was blown in the Rebel line, resulting in the Battle of the Crater.

June 25, 1864 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Point Pleasant, La.; at Rancho Las Rinas, Texas; at Morganfield, Ky.; and at Ashwood, Miss.

June 25, 1868 - Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina were readmitted to the Union.

June 25, 1876 – Native American forces led by chiefs Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull defeated U.S. Army troops led by Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn in southern Montana. About 210 men of the U.S. 7th Cavalry were killed by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians as the battle, which became known as “Custer’s Last Stand.”

June 25, 1878 – The Monroe Journal reported, in news from the Perdue Hill community, that the “new saloon of the Hill is handsomely fixed up, and looks neat, cozy and enticing. The liquors and cigars are the best brands, the wines are the best the market affords, and the best beer is always kept on tap.”

June 25, 1878 – The Monroe Journal reported in its “River Dots” column that the “palatial steamer Mary, Capt. Quill’s boat, certainly deserves well at the hands of our people. The Mary is regular and prompt and runs both summer and winter; she runs during the dull as well as business season, and at times at a great loss to her owners, no doubt – all for the accommodation of the people. Capt. Jno. Quill is a clever and accommodating gentleman, and Mr. Clay King, as first clerk, had won many ladies’ hearts, made hosts of warm friends, and we wish all – the Mary and her excellent officers – the continued success they so well merit.”

June 25, 1878 – The Monroe Journal reported that Mr. Find. McCorvey was in a semi-conscious state, being kept completely under the influence of opiates. When aroused, he recognized his friends, however, and was disposed to talk, but was unable to do so any length of time and then scarcely above a whisper.

June 25, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported that C.W. Robbins, editor of The Brewton Standard Gauge, attended the senatorial convention at Monroeville, Ala. the week before.

June 25, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported that, at a regular communication of Monroeville Lodge No. 153, the following officers were elected for the ensuing Masonic year: S.H. Daily, Worshipful Master; Jno. DeLoach, Senior Warden; S.W. Yarbrough, Junior Warden; D.J. Hatter, Treasurer; Q. Salter, Secretary; L.G. Steele, Senior Deacon; J.M. Sowell, Junior Deacon; S.F. Daniel, Tyler; W.G. McCorvey, J.F. Fore, Stewards.

June 25, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported, at a regular communication of Mount Pleasant Lodge No. 266, the following officers were elected for the ensuring Masonic year: E.T. King, Worshipful Master; J.W. Shomo, Senior Warden; C.E. King, Treasurer; W.A. Shomo, Secretary; F.J. Norris, Senior Deacon; R.G. Scott, Junior Deacon; W.D. Lambert, Tyler.

June 25, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported that, at a regular communication of Bells Landing Lodge No. 373, F.&A.M., the following officers were elected for the ensuing Masonic year: W.M. Hestle, Worshipful Master; J.G. Lambriecht, Senior Warden; Geo. W. Lyon, Junior Warden; Geo. W. Riley, Treasurer; A.P. Majors, Secretary; W.T. Reaves, Senior Deacon; W.W. Riley, Junior Deacon; Geo. C. Nettles, Tyler.

June 25, 1896 – The Monroe Journal, in news from the Perdue Hill community, reported that M.J. Roberts was erecting another story on the old Roberts, Locklin & Co. building on Broad Street.

June 25, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported, in news from the Jones Mills community, that Miss Maggie Busey was teaching school at the Escambia Creek and that she had a very large number of pupils.

June 25, 1903 – English novelist, essayist and critic George Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, British India. He is best known for his novels “Animal Farm” (1945) and “1984” (1949).

June 25, 1906 – Lightning struck the kitchen chimney of the J.C. Manning home, four miles southwest of Monroeville, Ala. shocking members of the family and breaking every piece of crockery in the house.

June 25, 1912 - Dr. H.M. Hawthorn of Wallace was in Evergreen, Ala. on business on this Tuesday.

June 25, 1913 – American Civil War veterans began arriving at the Great Reunion of 1913, which was held at Gettysburg National Military Park in Adams County, Pa. This reunion included a Gettysburg Battlefield encampment of American Civil War veterans for the Battle of Gettysburg's 50th anniversary. The June 29–July 4 gathering of 53,407 veterans (~8,750 Confederate) was the largest ever Civil War veteran reunion.

June 25, 1917 - The first American fighting troops landed in France.

June 25, 1918 - Babe Ruth became the second American League player to hit a home run in four consecutive games.

June 25, 1918 – National Baseball Hall of Fame first baseman Jake Beckley died at the age of 50 in Kansas City, Mo. During his career, he played for the Pittsburgh Alleghenys, the Pittsburgh Burghers, the Pittsburg Pirates, the New York Giants, the Cincinnati Reds and the St. Louis Cardinals. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

June 25, 1928 - Mr. A.C. Lee and Q. Salter, the editor of The Monroe Journal, went to Mobile on this Monday to be present at the dedication of the state docks.

June 25, 1928 - Monroeville was connected with Mobile on this Monday with the new bus line which was operated by W.S. Bowden. The bus was to leave Monroeville making stops at intermediate points for passengers. Those who wanted to go to Mobile and return the same day had five hours for pleasure or the transaction of business.

June 25, 1929 - Best-selling children’s author and illustrator Eric Carle was born in Syracuse, N.Y.

June 25, 1931 – State Rep. A.C. Lee of Monroeville, Ala. introduced a resolution, which passed, renaming the “William Wyatt Bibb Bridge” at Claiborne the “Claiborne-Murphy Bridge.”

June 25, 1933 - With Doc Jones registering his second shutout in a row, the Evergreen baseball team beat Greenville in Greenville on this Sunday afternoon, 2-0, to give them a four-game lead over the second-place Crenshaw County team from Luverne. Hester pitched for Greenville. Other players on Evergreen’s team that season included Skeeter Amos, Archie Barfield, Gaston, Joe Hagood, Hanna, Tom Kendall, Tom Melton and Moorer.

June 25, 1936 – Monroeville’s baseball team beat the Century-Flomaton team, 18-2, on this Thursday afternoon at Legion Field in Monroeville.

June 25, 1940 – The Montgomery Rebels of the Southeastern Baseball League stopped in Evergreen, Ala. to eat on their way to Mobile for a series against the Mobile Shippers.

June 25, 1942 – Dwight D. Eisenhower became the commander of the U.S. troops in Europe, and he would go on to become supreme commander of the entire Allied Armies in Europe.

June 25, 1942 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Charles Henry and Howard Prather of West Blocton went “snaking” recently and killed two big timber rattlers – one was 55 inches long, 6-1/4 inches in circumference and had 16 rattles; the other was 46 inches long, 5-1/4 inches around and with nine rattles.

June 25, 1943 – Greening Masonic Lodge No. 53 in Evergreen, Ala. installed its slate of officers for the coming year after the lodge’s annual election on June 11. The new officers included A.K. Williams, Worshipful Master; T.L. Jackson, Senior Warden; W.W. Overbey, Junior Warden; F.L. Cardwell, Treasurer; W.G. Jones, Secretary; Robert Soule, Senior Deacon; I.S. Baggett, Junior Deacon, S.J. Brundage, Tyler.

June 25, 1943 – During the Holocaust, Jews in the Częstochowa Ghetto in Poland staged an uprising against the Nazis.

June 25, 1947 – “The Diary of a Young Girl” (better known as “The Diary of Anne Frank”) was published.

June 25, 1948 – Alabama native Joe Louis knocked out veteran fighter Jersey Joe Walcott in a rematch to retain the heavyweight championship, which he’d held since 1937. Walcott and Louis first fought in December 1947 at Madison Square Garden, when Louis won a 15-round decision in which he struggled to counter Walcott’s unorthodox style. The 1948 fight was the 25th and final time that Louis successfully defended his belt, and he announced his retirement in March 1949.

June 25, 1950 – The Korean War began when communist forces from North Korea invaded South Korea. Most of the actual combat occurred in the first year of the war, but it dragged on and on and more than three million people lost their lives. Truce negotiations began in 1951, and they were the longest truce negotiations in the history of warfare, lasting two years and 17 days, with 575 meetings between the opposing sides.

June 25, 1953 – The Evergreen Greenies baseball team was scheduled to play the Brewton Millers in Brewton on this Thursday.

June 25, 1953 – The Evergreen Courant reported, under the headline “Conecuh Will Induct 13 Men In July,” that Alabama’s induction call for July 1953 would be 707 men, according to Col. J.T. Johnson Jr., Acting State Director of Selective Service. This first represented Alabama’s part of a national call of 23,000 men. All of these men were to be furnished to the Army and no men under 20 years of age were to be inducted in Alabama in July, Johnson said. The number of men Conecuh would be called upon to furnish for July was 13.

June 25, 1953 – The Monroe Journal reported that “Little Cliff Farish” spent the previous weekend in Beatrice with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Farish.

June 25, 1957 - Macon County, Ala. blacks kicked off a boycott of white businesses at a mass meeting in Tuskegee attended by 3,000 people. The boycott was in response to a plan to protect white political power in Tuskegee by gerrymandering its city limits so that all but a few African Americans would reside outside the city. The boycott, which brought national attention to Tuskegee, was sustained for four years and met many of the goals of its originator, the Tuskegee Civic Association.

June 25, 1957 - Late on this Tuesday afternoon 13 people escaped injury as a house on the outskirts of Evergreen was completely destroyed by fire. The Evergreen Fire Department answered the call, but was unable to hold the fire in check, as there were no fire hydrants nearby. The house was located behind Southern Coach, beside the L&N Railroad. Occupying the house were two women, Annie Mae Holley and four children, and Lillie Mae Stallworth, and seven children. No one was hurt in the blaze.

June 25, 1958 – In Conecuh County Circuit Court, James L. Lane was found guilty of first-degree manslaughter and sentence to five years in state prison in connection with the murder of Willie D. White in August 1957. Lane and Joe Lewis Bradley had both been indicted for second-degree murder in connection with White’s death, and Bradley had been sentenced to 15 years in prison during a trial prior to Lane’s. Lane’s case was unusual because he wasn’t actually present when White was shot, but under Alabama law, he could be charged with second-degree murder for having previous knowledge that the murder was going to take place and for being a part of it. Testimony at the trial showed that Lane drove Bradley to the house where Bradley got the gun to kill White then drove Bradley back to the place where Bradley later killed White and that Lane not only knew that Bradley planned to kill White but also encouraged Bradley to do so.

June 25, 1963 - The movie “,” with Alabama author Eugene Walter playing the role of an American journalist, was released in the United States.

June 25, 1965 - Two Viet Cong terrorist bombs ripped through a floating restaurant on the Saigon River. Thirty-one people, including nine Americans, were killed in the explosions. Dozens of other diners were wounded, including 11 Americans.

June 25, 1968 - Bobby Bonds of the San Francisco Giants hit a grand-slam home run in his first game with the Giants. He was the first player to debut with a grand-slam.

June 25, 1969 - The U.S. Navy turned 64 river patrol gunboats valued at $18.2 million over to the South Vietnamese Navy in what was described as the largest single transfer of military equipment in the war thus far.

June 25, 1973 – The Rev. F.P. Bachman began serving as pastor at the First Assembly of God in Evergreen, replacing the Rev. J.E. Welburn, who resigned to continue his ministry in Alaska.

June 25, 1973 - White House Counsel John Dean admitted that U.S. President Nixon took part in the Watergate cover-up.

June 25-27, 1978 - Enterprise Lodge No. 352 of the Knights of Pythias and Queen of Evergreen Court No. 562 was scheduled to host the 92nd annual session of the Grand Lodge Knights of Pythias and Grand Court Order of Calanthe of Alabama in Evergreen. This was said to be an historic occasion for Evergreen as this was the first time in its 92-year history that the Grand Lodge had convened in Evergreen. Sir Ellis Jackson was Chancellor Commander of Enterprise Lodge No. 352 and Sister Gussie V. Grace was Worthy Counsellor of Queen of Evergreen Court No. 562 and they were to act as official hosts for the session.

June 25, 1982 - John Carpenter's iconic science-fiction horror movie “The Thing” was released in U.S. theaters.

June 25, 1984 – American singer Prince released his most successful studio album, “Purple Rain.”

June 25, 1985 - New York Yankees officials enacted the rule that mandated that the team's bat boys were to wear protective helmets during all games.

June 25, 1996 – The Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia killed 19 U.S. servicemen.

June 25, 1997 – French oceanographer and explorer Jacques Cousteau died of a heart attack at the age of 87 in Paris, France and was buried in the family vault of Saint-Andre-de-Cubzac in France. He invented the Aqua-Lung diving apparatus and was known around the world as an ecologist and filmmaker.

June 25, 1997 - An unmanned Progress cargo spacecraft crashed into Russia's Mir space station, knocking out power and rupturing a laboratory.

June 25, 2002 - Monroe County Commissioners Alex Roberts and Carlisle McClure of Monroeville earned the Democratic party’s nominations on this Tuesday in a runoff election.

June 25, 2003 – Comic book superstar and avid baseball fan Todd McFarlane bought Barry Bonds 73rd home run ball at auction for $517,500.

June 25, 2004 – Conecuh County Sheriff’s deputies seized 23 kilograms of cocaine (about 50 pounds) during a traffic stop on Interstate Highway 65. The drugs had a street value of about $2 million.

June 25, 2004 – Conecuh County’s Relay For Life raised over $78,522.25 for the American Cancer Society.

June 25, 2007 - Evergreen’s 9- and 10-year-old all-stars exited the Little League Baseball District 5 tournament on this Monday in Brewton with a 16-6 loss to Andalusia. Evergreen opened the District 5, double-elimination tournament June 23 with a 9-4 win over Flomaton. In second-round action the all-stars suffered a 12-6 loss to East Brewton June 24.

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Daily Rainfall Observations from SW Alabama for Sun., June 25, 2017

Rainfall (Past 24 Hours): 0.00 inches.

Week to Date Rainfall: 6.50 inches.

Month to Date Rainfall:  10.05 inches.

Summer to Date Rainfall: 6.50 inches.

Year to Date Rainfall: 50.05 inches.

Notes: Today is the 176th day of 2017 and the fifth day of Summer. There are 189 days left in the year.

Readings taken at 0700 hours Central Standard Time (1300 GMT) daily, just west of the Monroe-Conecuh County line and south of U.S. Highway 84, near Excel, Alabama, USA, in the vicinity of Lat 31.42834N Lon 87.30131W. Elevation 400 feet above sea level. CoCoRaHS Station No. AL-MN-4, Station Name: Excel 2.5 ESE.

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Singleton recounts 33 years of exploring Monroe County's historic sites

George Buster Singleton
(For decades, local historian and paranormal investigator George “Buster” Singleton published a weekly newspaper column called “Somewhere in Time.” The column below, which was titled “First 33 years recalled” was originally published in the June 26, 1997 edition of The Monroe Journal in Monroeville, Ala.)

Saturday, the 28th day of June, will mark my 33rd anniversary in the county of Monroe. As I approach this coming date, I recall many events and happenings I have experienced during my stay here. I also remember several dear friends who have made my stay in the area much more enjoyable and interesting. Shortly after my arrival in the county, I was most fortunate to become friends with people like Mr. Raymond Fountain, Mr. Tom Snyder, Mr. Oscar Wiggins and Mrs. Louise “Lou” Cooper. Mrs. Cooper, now deceased, lived to be over 107 years old. Although she had lost her eyesight, she was ever alert and had an excellent memory.

Mrs. Cooper was hidden in a trunk when she and her parents returned to the town of Claiborne in 1863. Her parents had orders to leave her in Mobile because of the smallpox epidemic. So, not wanting to leave their only child, they hid her in a trunk and managed to come ashore at Claiborne Landing without the child being discovered. Fearing that their child might not be alive when they opened the trunk, the story goes that she was lying quietly, sucking her thumb after the trip upriver without any food. Many hours were spent talking to this dear lady and reliving her memories of the bygone days. These stories will live within my mind and hopefully I will be able to pass them onto others in times to come.

Much of the Indian history was passed on to me by my dear friend Uncle Tom Snyder. He knew all the locations of the discarded and forgotten burial grounds around the area. I asked my friend if he would go with me and spend one night in the Indian holy ground so we might witness the strange goings on that had been reported seen and heard there. His answer was “Heck no, Mr. Singleton. I’m getting too darn old to get scared out of my wits and run against a tree and hurt myself.” But, he showed me many historic places in the area that are unknown to most, but that I will always remember.

My authority for the area around Burnt Corn and the Pine Orchard area was Mr. Milford Champion. He knew every inch of that area and all that had taken place there since the area was settled. He, too, knew the locations of all the old burial grounds and the forgotten homeplaces. He knew the stories that took place there in the grown-up timbers and thickets where the old homes of the past once were located. He also had an excellent memory of early Indian history of that area. He proved to me beyond a shadow of doubt that the famed Indian town of Maubila was located in the area of Pine Orchard. All the evidence needed to prove this fact was later destroyed by a logging firm a few years back. Milford Champion was a great local historian; too bad his knowledge of local history wasn’t recorded.

Mr. Oscar Wiggins knew every rock and stump around the old Red Hills community. We spent many hours wandering here and there in the area, hearing each story, time and again of the old families and their ways of earning a living. Never did we go into the Red Hills area without a visit to the old cemetery where Mr. Oscar’s ancestors now sleep. Always, the story was of his ancestor who first settled there in the area. He took great pride of his ancestor who wore the uniform of the Confederacy. I never grew tired of his stories and of him showing me to locations of the old homesites of the past settlers. We would always try to go by the old Wiggins homeplace and sit and talk for a while. I remember one day we found an old handmade brick that had been a part of the ancient chimney of the family house. He wanted to break it in half and give me one half of it. I told him that I had rather he keep it all because of his ancestors. He wouldn’t have been any happier if he had found a nugget of gold. Each time I return to the Red Hills area, I think of my friend, Oscar Wiggins, and if time permits, I visit the old homesite and the graves of his ancestors.

My friend, Mr. Raymond Fountain, more than likely, had a greater knowledge of the whole county and surrounding area than anyone I have known since my stay in the area. Countless hours we would spend, roaming the area, both day and night, and visiting the locations where ghostly sightings and other happenings is said to have been witnessed there. We walked the road and crossed the bridge where the ghost of the Rebel solider is said to have camped under. The story of Nancy Mountain was first told to me by my dear friend. He also helped me investigate the mystery light in the Franklin area. The area of Bradley Ridge and the old cemeteries (now destroyed) were shown to me by my dear friend. He never seemed to grow tired of visiting again these locations and retelling the stories of the ghostly happenings that took place there. Next to fox hunting, I believe this was his second greatest pastime.

He knew the country; he, like myself couldn’t wait to return again to the old forgotten places; forgotten except for a very few who are fast departing this life. And, somewhere beyond the sunset, I’m sure Mr. Raymond is sitting on a hill, listening to his favorite foxhounds with names like Old Blue or Yellow Boy or the many others that he has known.

Yes, my stay in the area of Monroe County has been a very interesting and exciting one. I have come to know many good people of the area. I have gained many good friends here So, I end this article saying that I hope that the next 33 years will be as good as the last.


(Singleton, the author of the 1991 book “Of Foxfire and Phantom Soldiers,” passed away at the age of 79 on July 19, 2007. A longtime resident of Monroeville, he was born on Dec. 14, 1927 in Marengo County, graduated from Sweet Water High School, served in the Korean War, lived for a time among Apache Indians, moved to Monroe County on June 28, 1964 and served as the administrator of the Monroeville National Guard unit from 1964 to 1987. For years, Singleton’s column “Somewhere in Time” appeared in The Monroe Journal, and he wrote a lengthy series of articles about Monroe County that appeared in Alabama Life magazine. Some of his earlier columns also appeared under the heading of “Monroe County History: Did You Know?” He is buried in Pineville Cemetery in Monroeville. The column above and all of Singleton’s other columns are available to the public through the microfilm records at the Monroe County Public Library in Monroeville. Singleton’s columns are presented here each week for research and scholarship purposes and as part of an effort to keep his work and memory alive.)

'WALK TO MORDOR' UPDATE: 1,306 miles down and 493 miles to go

I continued my (virtual) “Walk to Mordor” during the past week by logging 10 more miles since my last update. I walked/jogged five miles on Friday and five more miles today (Saturday). So far, I’ve logged 1,306 total miles on this virtual trip to Mount Doom, and I’ve got 493 more miles to go before I reach Mordor. All in all, I’ve completed about 72.6 percent of the total trip.

 

In relation to Frodo’s overall journey to destroy the One Ring at Mount Doom in Mordor, I’m on the tenth day of the trip past Lothlorien, which is Feb. 25 on the Middle Earth calendar. I left off my last update on Mile 1296, which was three miles past the point where Frodo’s group, the Fellowship of the Ring, rested in their boats and ate before paddling on.

 

Ten miles later, at Mile 1306, Aragorn leads the group toward the west bank of the river. The next significant milestone comes three miles later and it’s one of the most significant milestones on the entire trip. Three miles later, the group will reach the lawn of Parth Galen below Amon Hen, and the group decides to camp there.

 

The next day, the Fellowship breaks apart, which is how the first book of the trilogy, “The Fellowship of the Ring,” ends. At that point, Frodo (and me) will have traveled a total of 1,309 miles from Bag End to Rauros Falls.

 

For those of you reading this for the first time, I began this “Walk to Mordor” fitness challenge on Jan. 1, 2015. Using a book called “The Atlas of Middle-Earth” by Karen Wynn Fonstad, fans of “The Lord of the Rings” created this challenge by mapping out Frodo’s fictional trek to Mordor, calculating the total distance at 1,799 miles. They also used the original "Lord of the Rings" text to outline the journey, so you can follow their route by keeping up with your total mileage.

 

The folks who worked out the nuts and bolts of this virtual journey have divided it into four parts. It’s 458 miles from Hobbiton to Rivendell, 462 miles from Rivendell through Moria to Lothlorien, 389 miles from Lothlorien down the Anduin to Rauros Falls and 470 miles from Rauros to Mount Doom. (Those locations should sound very familiar to “Lord of the Rings” fans.) The hobbits averaged 18 miles a day, but if you walk (or jog, as I sometimes do) five miles a day, it’s possible to cover 1,799 miles in a year.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about the “Walk to Mordor Challenge,” I suggest you check out two Web sites, http://www.nerdfitness.com/blog/2012/07/23/walking/ and http://home.insightbb.com/~eowynchallenge/. Both of these sites provide a ton of details about the challenge, including how to get started.

 


In the end, check back next Friday for another update and to see how much closer I am to Mordor. I hope to knock out at least 10 more miles next week, and I’ll include all that in my update next week.

Today in History for June 24, 2017

John Hosea King
June 24, 1314 – During the First War of Scottish Independence, the Battle of Bannockburn concluded with a decisive victory by Scottish forces led by Robert the Bruce, though England did not recognize Scottish independence until 1328 with the signing of the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton.


June 24, 1374 – A sudden outbreak of St. John's Dance caused people in the streets of Aachen, Germany to experience hallucinations and begin to jump and twitch uncontrollably until they collapsed from exhaustion. This outbreak of dancing plague or dancing mania is also known as St. Vitus’ Dance. Scientists tend to believe it was due to ergot poisoning or mass hysteria.

June 24, 1497 – Italian explorer John Cabot, sailing in the service of England, landed in North America at Newfoundland leading the first European exploration of the region since the Vikings.

June 24, 1542 – Mystic and poet St. John of the Cross was born in Hontiveros, Spain and is the patron saint of mystics, contemplatives and Spanish poets.

June 24, 1597 – The first Dutch voyage to the East Indies reached Bantam (on Java).

June 24, 1604 – Samuel de Champlain discovered the mouth of the Saint John River, site of Reversing Falls and the present-day city of Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada.

June 24, 1664 - New Jersey, named after the Isle of Jersey, was founded.

June 24, 1717 – The Premier Grand Lodge of England, the first Masonic Grand Lodge in the world (now the United Grand Lodge of England), was founded in London.

June 24, 1777 – Scottish commander and Arctic explorer John Ross was born in Inch, Wigtownshire, Scotland.

June 24, 1778 - The Continental Congress returned to Philadelphia. They had been in York, Pa. during the British occupation of Philadelphia.

June 24, 1779 – During the American Revolutionary War, the Great Siege of Gibraltar began.

June 24, 1803 - Matthew Thornton, one of New Hampshire’s delegates to the second Continental Congress and an ex post facto signer of the Declaration of Independence, died at age 89 while visiting his daughter in Newburyport, Mass.

June 24, 1831 - Alabama author Rebecca Harding Davis was born in Washington, Pa.

June 24, 1842 – Journalist, satirist and short-story writer Ambrose Bierce, nicknamed “Bitter Bierce,” was born near Horse Cave Creek in Meigs County, Ohio. He wrote essays, journalism, and satire, and he’s well known for his short stories, especially “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” (1890) and “The Devil’s Dictionary” (1906). He volunteered for the Union Army when the Civil War broke out and fought in some of its bloodiest battles.

June 24, 1861 - Federal gunboats attacked Confederate batteries at Mathias Point, Va.

June 24, 1861 – During the Civil War, a skirmish was fought at Jackson, Missouri.

June 24, 1862 - U.S. President Abraham Lincoln met with retired General Winfield Scott at West Point, N.Y. to discuss Union strategy in Virginia. Scott was a hero of the Mexican War and the commander of all Union forces at the outbreak of the Civil War.

June 24, 1862 – During the Civil War, Federal reconnaissance was conducted from Washington to Tranter’s Creek, N.C. Skirmishes were also fought on Hamilton’s Plantation, near Grand Gulf, Miss. and at Mechanicsville, Virginia

June 24, 1863 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Mound Plantation, near lake Providence, Bayou Boeuf, and Chacahoula Station in Louisiana; and at Middleton, Big Springs Ranch, Christina, Hoover’s Gap and Liberty Gap in Tennessee.

June 24, 1863 – During the Civil War, the siege at Vicksburg, Miss. entered Day 37.

June 24, 1864 - Union commander Ambrose Burnside approved the plan for troops to dig a tunnel toward the Confederates at Petersburg, Va. with the intention of using gunpowder to blow a gap in the Rebel fortifications. The explosion was successfully set off on July 30.

June 24, 1864 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Allatoona and Spring Place, Ga.; at Roanoke Station, Va.; at Morganfield, Ky.; at Ashwood, Miss.; at Point Pleasant, La.; at Rancho Las Rinas, Texas; and along the Yellow River in Florida.

June 24, 1865 – During the Civil War, commercial restrictions were removed from states and territories west of the Mississippi River by President Johnson.

June 24, 1878 - The body of a man was found on this Monday lying in a grove in the suburbs of Pine Apple. The body, when found, presented a horrible and sickening sight. The head was split open and flies and maggots and buzzards had indeed made a loathsome and nauseating spectacle of the corpse. It had evidently laid there several days. The Monroe Journal later learned that another man had been arrested on suspicion of the murder, and when he was closely questioned, acknowledged to having committed the terrible crime. Cause, jealousy.

June 24, 1886 – The Monroe Journal reported that the following officers had been elected for Monroeville Masonic Lodge No. 153 for the ensuing year: S.H. Daily, Worshipful Master; T.L. Sowell, Senior Warden; W.W. McMillan, Junior Warden; D.J. Hatter, Treasurer; A.M. Leslie, Secretary; J.F. Fore, Senior Deacon; G.W. Salter, Junior Deacon; Isaac Andress, Tyler.

June 24, 1886 – The Monroe Journal reported that Dr. J.M. Wiggins of Lower Peach Tree visited his father that week.

June 24, 1895 – Heavyweight boxing champion Jack Dempsey, who was known as the “Manassa Mauler,” was born in Manassa, Colo. and went on to reign as the heavyweight champion from 1919 to 1926.

June 24, 1896 - Booker T. Washington, president of Tuskegee Institute, became the first African American to be awarded an honorary degree by Harvard University. Born into slavery in Virginia, Washington moved to Alabama in 1881 to open Tuskegee Normal School. He soon gained fame as an educational leader among black Americans, a fact which Harvard recognized with a Master of Arts degree.

June 24, 1896 – The Hon. Chas. L. Scott of Mount Pleasant visited Monroeville, Ala. on this Wednesday to attend the senatorial convention.

June 24, 1896 - Miss Willie Johnson of the River Ridge community was accidentally shot by her little brother Carlie on this Wednesday. He was carrying his rifle through the house and not knowing it was loaded, “handled it carelessly” and it went off and struck Willie in the neck, according to The Monroe Journal. She apparently eventually recovered from her wounds.

June 24, 1900 - Alabama author Zelda Fitzgerald was born in Montgomery, Ala.

June 24, 1903 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Robert Powell and wife of Montgomery, Ala., after spending several days fishing at Garland, had returned home.

June 24, 1903 – The Evergreen Courant reported that, at the regular communication of Greening Lodge No. 53, A.F.&A.M., the following officers were elected: H.A. Shields, Worshipful Master; J.T. Amos, Senior Warden; D.W. Powell, Junior Warden; M.W. Etheridge, Treasurer; Geo. W. Salter Jr., Secretary; Y.M. Long, Senior Deacon; E.E. Newton, Junior Deacon; J.H. Stamps, Tyler; H.L. Tucker and T.H. Millers, Stewards.

June 24, 1903 – The Evergreen Courant reported that, at a regular communication of Repton Lodge No. 575, the following officers were elected: Geo. W. Salter Sr., Worshipful Master; John S. Watson, Senior Warden; Wm. M. Newton, Junior Warden; Jas. E. Robinson, Treasurer; Chas. E. Kelly, Secretary; Andrew J. Straughn, Senior Deacon; Henry L. Dees, Junior Deacon; Geo. W. Lee, Tyler; James W. Langham, Wm. Williams, Stewards; and John W. Breedlove, Chaplain.

June 24, 1906 – A group of young people gathered at Rikard’s Mill on this Sunday to go boat riding, but they didn’t ride long after they found alligator tracks on the bank of the creek.

June 24, 1907 - Mizpah Lodge No. 667, F.A.&A.M., planned to celebrate St. John’s Day at Manistee on this day. A basket picnic dinner was to be served and visiting Masonic brethren were cordially welcomed. Citizens living within convenient distance were invited to attend with well-filled baskets.

June 24, 1907 – Thompson Hamilton (Hamp) Coker died at his home at Abbot in Conecuh County, four miles from the place he was born, at the age of 83 years. The deceased was at one time sheriff of Monroe County, and was held in esteem by those of our older citizens who knew him. Born on May 26, 1825 in Monroe County, he was buried in the Mount Pleasant Methodist Church Cemetery at Skinnerton. He was widely known throughout Southwest Alabama, having served as Monroe County Sheriff for four years, before moving to Evergreen.

June 24, 1908 – Former U.S. President Grover Cleveland died of a heart attack at the age of 71 in Princeton, N.J. He had served as President of the United States for two separate terms (1885-1889 and 1893-1897).

June 24, 1912 - The remains of Maggie Relfe Donaldson, who died on June 23 at her home in Montgomery, were brought and interred in Evergreen cemetery on this Monday afternoon. Deceased was a sister of W.C. Relfe of West Side. She was 52 years old and was survived by her husband and three children. Robert Relfe and Payne Robertson of Montgomery came down to the funeral of Donaldson on this Monday. Deceased was a sister of Relfe.

June 24, 1914 - The Monroeville, Ala. baseball team played Atmore and “as usual, came off victor, the score being four to three.”

June 24, 1915 – On this Wednesday morning, John Salter and Robert Watkins were arrested at a residence in Evergreen, Ala. They would later confess to the brutal murder of Martha Lassiter, the attempted murder of Wiley House and the robbery and burning of House’s residence near Burnt Corn on June 23, 2015.

June 24, 1915 - Young Oswald Boelcke, one of the earliest and best German fighter pilots of World War I, made the first operational flight of the Fokker Eindecker plane.

June 24, 1916 – Poet John Ciardi was born in Little Italy in Boston’s North End.

June 24, 1916 - John F. McKinley, postmaster at River Ridge, was shot and instantly killed on this Saturday night. McKinley had just arisen from the supper table and walked out on the porch at his home when, without warning, the fatal shot was fired from the darkness, evidently at close range, the entire charge of buckshot taking effect in the chest. McKinley died almost immediately. The alarm spread quickly over the community and a number of neighbors soon gathered but nothing was found to indicate the identity of the assassin. Sheriff Sawyer was notified of the crime and hastened to scene. Investigation was instituted and certain circumstances were discovered, casting strong suspicions upon certain individuals upon the strength of which several arrests were made. Among those taken into custody were William McKinley and Ed McKinley, father and son, the latter a young man about 20 years old and mail carrier on the star route between Tunnel Springs and Franklin. After remaining in jail several days, the McKinleys notified Solicitor McDuffie and associate prosecuting attorneys that they wished to make voluntary statements concerning the killing and the opportunity was given each of them to do so under oath. When brought before the Solicitor, Ed McKinley made a clean admission of the whole horrible affair, confessing circumstantially and in detail how he deliberately planned and executed the crime. The statement of the father, Wm. McKinley corroborated that of his son as regards a previous threat and an admission of guilt after the crime was committed. He stated that he endeavored to dissuade his son from the violent purpose and thought he had succeeded in doing so. It was not believed that the father had any criminal connection with the affair.

June 24, 1918 - Bob Long, J.D. Deming, C.P. Deming Jr., R.E. Salter and Henry McFarland attended the great Masonic Shriners ceremonial in Florala on this Monday, according to The Evergreen Courant.

June 24, 1922 - The American Professional Football Association took the name of the National Football League.

June 24, 1928 - Babe Ruth smashed out his 28th homerun of the year in the third inning of New York Yankees-Boston Red Sox game in New York on this Sunday. No one was on base. Russell was pitching for the Red Sox. The drive put Ruth 19 games, 15 days and four homeruns ahead of the pace he followed the previous year to establish a new season record of 60. Ruth hit his 28th and 29th homers in 1927 year in his 29th game on July 9, Ken Holloway of Detroit being victim. This Sunday’s game was Ruth’s 60th. On June 24 in 1927 he had only 24 homes runs to his credit.

June 24, 1928 - Judge M.M. Fountain left on this Sunday for Houston, Texas, where he planned to attend the Democratic Convention.

June 24, 1930 – Thomas Franklin “Frank” Rumbley, one of the older citizens in the Monroeville area, died on this Tuesday about noon at the age of 62. He was buried Wed., June 25, the service being in charge of the Masonic Lodge, of which Rumbley had been an honored member for a long time. Born on Aug. 2, 1867 in Alabama, he was buried in the Baptist Cemetery in Monroeville.

June 24, 1935 - Journalist Pete Hamill is born on this day in 1935 to Irish immigrants in Brooklyn. He is best known for his 1995 book, “A Drinking Life.”

June 24, 1937 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Col. Jim Walton of Meridian, Miss., the Secretary-Director of the General Sam Dale Historical Society, was in Conecuh County, Ala. that week, “checking records and unraveling the ancient history of Sam Dale and his connection with history of the county, especially the battle of Burnt Corn.”

June 24, 1937 – Baseball teams from Evergreen and Brewton were scheduled to play a doubleheader at Gantt Field in Evergreen, Ala. on this Thursday, starting at 2:30 p.m.

June 24, 1937 – Novelist Anita Desai was born in Mussoorie, India.

June 24, 1938 – Pieces of a meteor, estimated to have weighed 450 metric tons when it hit the Earth's atmosphere and exploded, land near Chicora, Pennsylvania.

June 24, 1938 – Major League Baseball first baseman Don Mincher was born in Huntsville, Ala. He would go on to play for the Washington Senators, the Minnesota Twins, the California Angels, the Seattle Pilots, the Oakland Athletics and the Texas Rangers.

June 24, 1939 - Mrs. A.C. Lee, Miss Nelle Lee and Edwin Lee attended the Sowell-McKinley wedding in Atmore on this Saturday.

June 24, 1939 – Poet Stephen Dunn was born in Forest Hills, N.Y. His poetry collection, “Different Hours,” won the Pulitzer Prize in 2001.

June 24, 1942 - John Hosea King, age 71, a well-known and respected farmer and Freemason, died at his home eight miles east of Evergreen at 1 a.m. on this Wednesday morning, following an illness of about two weeks. Deceased was a native and lifelong resident of the community in which he lived. He engaged in farming and sawmilling and was one of the leading citizens of his community. Born on Dec. 20, 1867, he was buried in the King Cemetery at Flat Rock.

June 24, 1947 - Pilot Kenneth Arnold reported seeing nine UFOs over Mount Rainier, Wash., which he described as like "saucers skipping over the water." His sighting was the first widely reported UFO sighting, kicked off the modern UFO era and led the press to coin the phrase 'flying saucers.'

June 24, 1948 – The Evergreen Courant reported that J. Cliff Harper had resigned his post as principal of Evergreen High School during the past week to accept the position of full time secretary of the Alabama High School Athletic Association. Harper was to assume his new duties on July 1 when he relieved Sellers Strough who had served in a part-time capacity as secretary for 25 years. This was a big step forward for the Alabama High School Athletic Association. This full-time post had long been needed to bring the state’s high school sports organization up to par with other states such as Texas, Georgia and New York. Harper and his staff of workers were to have offices in Montgomery. Strough was to work with Harper for the first month acquainting him with his new duties. Mr. and Mrs. Harper and Mr. and Mrs. Strough of Birmingham were attending the national meeting of the Executive Secretaries of the State Athletic Associations in Piquot Lake, Min. They were to be there for a week during which time rules, regulations, etc. for the next year would be discussed and voted on. Harper had served as principal at Evergreen High School for the previous two years. He was a native of Pineapple, Ala. and earned his A.B. at Birmingham Southern where he played end on the football team. After having coached two years at Sardis High School, Harper earned his M.S. at Auburn in 1939. He then served as principal and coach at Spring Garden High for four years and at Georgiana for one year before entering the Army. Harper entered the Army as a private and was separated from the service as a captain. While in the Army, he served as a director of athletics and physical training. Harper’s record at Evergreen High School had been outstanding. A firm believer in a strong athletic and physical training program, he organized an excellent intra-mural program at Evergreen High. He also set up and directed a summer recreation program for the City of Evergreen.

June 24, 1948 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Conecuh County Superintendent of Education H.G. Pate had announced that J.J. “Jack” Finklea, a former citizen of Evergreen, then living in Cuthbert, Ga., had accepted the position of principal of the Evergreen High School, succeeding J. Cliff Harper, who resigned the week before. Finklea, with his wife and two children, planned to move to Evergreen to assume his duties around July 15.

June 24, 1948 - The Evergreen Greenies were scheduled to play Booneville at McCullough on this Thursday. Their game in Evergreen on Sun., June 20, was rained out.

June 24, 1951 – On this Sunday afternoon in Conecuh Amateur League play, the Loree Dollies were scheduled to play the Paul Aces at Paul, Ala.

June 24, 1952 – In their first game of the season, Evergreen’s Junior American Legion baseball team lost to Andalusia, 8-7, in Andalusia, Ala. Evergreen pitcher Hugh Ellington struck out three, walked one and gave up six hits on the mound and led the team at the plate with two hits.

June 24, 1949 – The first television western, Hopalong Cassidy, was aired on NBC starring William Boyd.

June 24, 1954 – During the First Indochina War, at the Battle of Mang Yang Pass, Viet Minh troops belonging to the 803rd Regiment ambushed G.M. 100 of France in An Khê.

June 24, 1960 - At a meeting of the Monroe County Board of Education on this Friday, Joe Shelton Morris Jr. of Eutaw was named coach at J.U. Blacksher High School at Uriah, while Miss Elva Deitz of Montgomery was elected vocational home economics instructor at Beatrice High School.

June 24, 1962 – Greening Masonic Lodge No. 53 in Evergreen, Ala. was scheduled to install its newly elected officers during a regular meeting on this day.

June 24, 1962 - The New York Yankees beat the Detroit Tigers, 9-7, after 22 innings.

June 24, 1963 – In Evergreen Senior Baseball League action, the Tigers downed the Indians, 9-5, on this Monday night to strengthen their grip on first place, improving to 5-0 on the season. A triple by Jerry Johnson was the big hit of the Tigers’ seven-run first inning. Singles by Clint Ward, Jimmy Warren and Paul Deason helped put three tallies across the plate for the losers in the third. Wayne Pate was the winner on the hill although he was relieved in the fourth by Bubba Faulkner. Bill Snowden and Knud Nielsen were the Indian pitchers with Snowden taking the loss.

June 24, 1963 – In Evergreen Senior Baseball League action, the Braves whipped the Pirates, 5-2, on this Monday night to take over second place in the Senior League pennant race. Including this night’s win, the Braves record were 3-2 while the Bucs were 2-3. The Braves scored three runs in the first frame on only one hit, a single by Terry Coleman. Grover Jackson took the hill win, with Johnny Brown pitching the last inning for the victors. Chastain was the loser although Steve Baggett took over after two outs in the first inning. Brave shortstop Terry Coleman was injured when struck in the eye by a throw in the fourth inning. He was taken to the Conecuh County Hospital for examination.

June 24, 1968 - Jim Northrup of the Detroit Tigers tied a Major League Baseball record when he hit two grand slams in one game.

June 24, 1970 – Birmingham, Ala. native Lee May hit the last home run in the history of Cincinnati’s Crosley Field during the park’s final game. The game-winning shot came in the eighth inning off San Francisco Giants pitcher Juan Marichal.

June 24, 1970 - In an amendment offered by Senator Robert Dole (R-Kansas) to the Foreign Military Sales Act, the Senate voted 81 to 10 to repeal the Tonkin Gulf Resolution.

June 24, 1973 - Graham Martin was sworn in as Ambassador to South Vietnam, replacing Ellsworth Bunker, who had served in that position since April 1967.

June 24, 1974 - Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" was released.

June 24, 1975 - The Monroeville City Council on this Tuesday voted to accept preliminary plans for remodeling of the city hall and to advertise for bids on the work. Bids on renovation of the city hall were to be opened at 8:30 p.m. July 22. Bill Wiggins of Southern General Contractors, Inc. of Monroeville, who had helped design the renovation, said construction might take five or six months to complete.

June 24, 1976 – NFL running back and assistant coach Brock Olivo was born in St. Louis, Mo. He went on to play for Missouri and the Detroit Lions and also served as an assistant coach at Coastal Carolina and the Kansas City Chiefs.

June 24, 1979 - Bob Watson of the Houston Astros hit for the cycle against San Francisco. On Sept. 15, 1979, he became the first player to hit for the cycle in both leagues when he did it with the Boston Red Sox.

June 24, 1983 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the Conecuh County Sheriff’s Department, under Sheriff Edwin L. Booker, had seized 75 marijuana plants from a field in northeast Conecuh County, Ala., between McKenzie and Travis Bridge. The plants were six to 10 feet in height and had an estimated street value of $15,000. The marijuana was spotted from the air by a helicopter used by the Alabama Bureau of Investigation.

June 24, 1984 – The Blueberry Hill lounge on State Highway 59 between Uriah and Huxford in Monroe County was destroyed by fire on this Sunday. The building was already engulfed in flames at 12:30 p.m. when the Atmore Fire Department arrived with eight men and two trucks, according to Atmore Fire Chief Charles Rutherford. He said the fire was reported in Atmore at 12:15 p.m. by a neighbor.

June 24, 1993 - Yale University computer science professor David Gelernter was seriously injured while opening his mail when a padded envelope explodes in his hands. The attack just came two days after a University of California geneticist was injured by a similar bomb and was the latest in a string of bombings since 1978 that authorities believed to be related. In the aftermath of the attack on Gelernter, various federal departments established the UNABOM Task Force, which launched an intensive search for the so-called “Unabomber.”

June 24, 1997 – The U.S. Air Force issued a 231-page report, titled “The Roswell Report, Case Closed,” dismissing the long-standing claims of an alien spacecraft crash near Roswell, New Mexico in 1947. They suggested that recovered bodies were not those of aliens but crash test dummies used in parachute experiments.

June 24, 1997 – The 12-2 Braves were named the league champions on this Tuesday night as Evergreen Little League closed out the 1997 season. The members of the Braves were Jonathan Booth, Bryan Boykin, Pierre Evans, Robert Kent, Josh Macks, Anthony Maxwell, Jonathan Rodgers, Bryson Stallworth, Edward Thomas, Josh Watson and Josh Williams. The team’s coaches were Jackie Gorum, Ronnie Kent and Jerry Evers.

June 24, 1999 – The Monroe Journal reported that Excel’s Giants won the South Monroe Little League championship in the Major League division for the second straight season, recording a perfect 12-0 record that season. Team members included Trisha Smith, David Busby, Adam Smith, Brian House, Cade Jay, Bobby Farish, Coach Steve McInnis, Neal Butler, Kyle Dorriety, Blake White, Coach David Tuberville, Trent Dawson, Josh House, Coach Bruce White and Jerry Elliott.

June 24, 1999 – The Monroe Journal reported that the Monroeville Little League’s 11- and 12-year-old all-stars drew a first-round bye in the District 3 tournament in Bay Minette. The team was to play on Sun., July 4, at 5 p.m. against the winner of a game between Lowndes County and Bay Minette that was set to be played Sat., July 3, at 2 p.m. Members of Monroeville’s team included Terrell Armstrong, Charley Kirkland, Josh Lowery, Josh Goldman, Leterius Leggitte, Terrance Wiggins, Gecoby Penn, Watson Black, Anthony Stovall, Demetrius Harris, Terrell Richardson and Jeremy Rush. Coaches included James Harris, Marshall Gibbs and Wynesta Stanton.

June 24, 2003 - Barry Bonds of the San Francisco Giants became the first player to reach 500 home runs and 500 stolen bases.

June 24, 2005 – The first geocache ever established in Conecuh County was placed near the southbound rest stop on Interstate Highway 65, south of Evergreen, Ala.


June 24, 2013 - The pilot episode of "Under the Dome" aired.