Thursday, August 17, 2017

Daily Rainfall Observations from SW Alabama for Thurs., Aug. 17, 2017

Rainfall (Past 24 Hours): 0.00 inches.

Week to Date Rainfall: 0.60 inches.

Month to Date Rainfall:  5.55 inches.

Summer to Date Rainfall: 21.90 inches.

Year to Date Rainfall: 65.45 inches.

Notes: Today is the 229th day of 2017 and the 58th day of Summer. There are 136 days left in the year.

Readings taken at 0700 hours Central Standard Time (1300 GMT) daily, just west of the Monroe-Conecuh County line and south of U.S. Highway 84, near Excel, Alabama, USA, in the vicinity of Lat 31.42834N Lon 87.30131W. Elevation 400 feet above sea level. CoCoRaHS Station No. AL-MN-4, Station Name: Excel 2.5 ESE.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

100-year-old news highlights from The Wilcox Progressive Era

What follows are 100-year-old news excerpts from the Aug. 16, 1917 edition of The Wilcox Progressive Era newspaper in Camden, Ala.

Death of Capt. T.A. Nettles: Many of his friends in Wilcox County will regret to learn of the death of Capt. Tom Nettles, which occurred at his home recently. Capt. Nettles was born at Pineville in Monroe County and at the time of his death was 75 years old. He was twice married, first to Miss Mattie Robins and after her death to Miss Mary E. Lee. He leaves surviving him a wife and four daughters viz. Mesdames S.J. and W.A. Stallworth of Beatrice, Mrs. J.E. Cook of Montgomery, Mrs. W.S. Nash of Tunnel Springs and 10 sons, all being worthy men. He was a prominent figure in Monroe County, being a large planter and merchant, an upright Mason and a true Confederate soldier; a worth husband, father and friend.

Dr. T. Warb Jones, who volunteered for enlistment in the great war now pending, has been accepted for service. He will be commissioned either as a lieutenant or captain.

A large rattlesnake about four or five feet long and with eight rattles and a button was seen in the courthouse yard last Tuesday. It was killed by John Miller while on a hunt in the river bottoms.

Furman: Dr. W.L. Hurd of the U.S. Medical reserve corps is visiting Dr. J.D. Perdue.

Mr. Leslie Duke is at Hot Springs, Ark. for relief from rheumatism and is reported to be improved.

Cotton picking baskets are being brought to town for sale.

Mesdames C.R. Duke, J.H. Duke, W.B. Jones, T.W. Jones and S.R. Fairly attended the Baptist Women’s Missionary Society at Oak Hill last Tuesday.

Mr. W.S. Capell of the Grampian Hills says the cotton crop is splendid and the corn crop is better than he has ever seen it and the present prospects are that more velvet beans will be made than can be gathered. It is the best corn crop this year that has ever been made on Pusley Creek and Mr. Capell has lived near there all of his life. Cotton is doing fine and hogs are plentiful.

New mown hay is now coming to town and plenty of it.

Mr. and Mrs. T.J. Jones of Selma were visitors to Camden last Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. W.M. Cook new reside in Selma.

Mr. and Mrs. W.R. Alford Sr. and Mr. and Mrs. Alford Jr. and Mr. R.L. Rentz have returned from a trip to Louisiana.

Mr. W.S. Irby Sr. of Lower Peach Tree says that we have the best crops here than in the last three or four years, and I refer to corn, cotton, beans, peas, sugar cane and millet. Potatoes are late on account of dry weather. Cattle and hogs are fine.


The following county citizens were in Camden last Monday attending Commissioners Court: Messers E.T. Wilkerson, P. Giddens, M.L. Stabler, H. Wilkerson, Ben Stabler, E.L. Cunningham, Sam Wright, Joe Lambright, W.D. Kennedy, S.R. Thompson Jr., D. Berson, W.M. Reaves Jr., K.A. Mayer, Jeffreys Gibson, I.E. Agee, K.E. Agee, R.F. Stokes, W.L. Bruce, Dan Hestle, W.A. Minifee, E. Twilley, B. Minefee, Dr. W. Fudge, B. Crocker, W.S. Irby Sr., W.S. Irby Jr., Mr. and Mrs. J.D. Shelly, W. Vaughn.

When was the first high school football team fielded in Wilcox County?

Wilcox Academy fielded its first team in 1970.
The varsity football players at Wilcox Academy and Wilcox Central High School have been going through preseason football drills for over two weeks now as they prepare for their regular season openers on Aug. 25. Wilcox Academy will play Sparta Academy that night at Wildcat Field in Camden, while Wilcox Central will travel to Selma to take on Ellwood Christian at Memorial Stadium.

Like a lot of men reading this column, my football-playing days ended a long time ago, but I think that it’s important for today’s high school players at Wilcox Academy and Wilcox Central to know that they are taking part in a Wilcox County tradition that is nearly a century old.

As a hobby, for nearly 20 years, I’ve spent countless hours going through old newspapers looking up stories about old football games, recording their scores and outcomes and submitting them to the Alabama High School Football Historical Society. (In fact, I was one of six founding members of that organization when it was formed in 2007, and I’ve served on its board of directors ever since.)

I say all that to say that despite all the research that’s been done, a number of questions about high school football history in Wilcox County remain unanswered. When was the first official high school team fielded in Wilcox County? When and where was that team’s first official game played and who was their opponent? Who won and what was the score? Who was the first high school football coach in Wilcox County history?


Based on research done by the AHSFHS, it appears that Wilcox County High School in Camden fielded the first high school football team in the county’s history in 1921, and their first documented game was played on Oct. 15 against Jackson High School. In that game, Jackson reportedly beat WCHS, 102-0. (That is not a typo.) Jackson’s head coach that season was a man whose last name was Steed, but the name of WCHS’s coach that year is currently unknown.

Wilcox County changed its name to Wilcox Central in 1989
With that said, it is highly possible that WCHS fielded a team prior to 1921, but if so, AHSFHS researchers have not uncovered that information yet. High school football was very informal in its early years, and the news and results of high school games weren’t widely publicized like they are today. (Also, it wasn’t unheard of for non-students, recent graduates and grown men to come down out of the stands and play in full contact games, especially if the home or visiting team happened not to have enough players.)

Other Wilcox County schools known to have fielded teams at some point in their histories, aside from those already mentioned, include Camden Academy, Catherine Academy, Millers Ferry, Pine Apple, Pine Hill, Snow Hill Institute and Stokes Academy. If you’re interested in learning more about the teams at those schools, as well as past teams at Wilcox Academy, Wilcox Central and Wilcox County High School, I invite you to visit the AHSFHS’s website at www.ahsfhs.org. The website is constantly being updated as researchers uncover more information about Alabama high school football history.

In the end, I would like to hear from anyone in the reading audience who has more information about the early history of high school football in Wilcox County. In addition to old newspaper articles, other great sources for this type of information include old yearbooks, memory books, schedules and football programs. Any information that I receive will be passed along to the AHSFHS, so that it will be made available to future generations of researchers, football fans and Wilcox County residents for years to come.

Today in History for Aug. 16, 2017

The famous Stokes Alligator of Wilcox County, Ala.
Aug. 16, 1679 – English philosopher and playwright Catharine Trotter Cockburn was born in London.


Aug. 16, 1777 – During the American Revolutionary War, the Americans led by General John Stark routed British and Brunswick troops under Friedrich Baum at the Battle of Bennington in Walloomsac, N.Y.

Aug. 16, 1777 - General Nicholas Herkimer died from the wounds he had suffered 10 days earlier when his men were ambushed attempting to relieve Fort Stanwix.

Aug. 16, 1780 – During the American Revolutionary War, at the Battle of Camden, the British, under General Charles Cornwallis, defeated Americans, under the command of General Horatio Gates, near Camden, South Carolina.

Aug. 16, 1812 – During the War of 1812, American General William Hull surrendered Fort Detroit without a fight to the British Army and Indian fighters led by Tecumseh.

Aug. 16, 1854 – George Clothies was commissioned for his second of two terms as Monroe County, Alabama’s Sheriff.

Aug. 16, 1858 – U.S. President James Buchanan inaugurated the new transatlantic telegraph cable by exchanging greetings with Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom.

Aug. 16, 1861 – During the Civil War, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln prohibited the Union states from trading with the states of the Confederacy.

Aug. 16, 1861 – During the Civil War, a skirmish was fought at Sandy Hook, Md.

Aug. 16, 1862 – During the Civil War, George McClellan completed the evacuation of Harrison's Landing, ending the Peninsula Campaign. His men landed at Aquia Creek, Va. and Alexandria, Va. within the week, but most were reassigned to John Pope's Army of Virginia.

Aug. 16, 1862 – During the Civil War, Don Carlos Buell ordered William "Bull" Nelson to assume command of federal forces in Kentucky.

Aug. 16, 1862 – During the Civil War, Brigadier General Charles Stone was released from prison in New York.

Aug. 16, 1862 – During the Civil War, Corpus Christi, Texas was bombarded by Union forces.

Aug. 16, 1862 – During the Civil War, an action took place at Lone Jack, Mo., and skirmishes were fought near Corinth and at Horn Lake Creek, Miss.; at Wire Bridge, W.Va.; and at Merewether’s Ferry, Tenn.

Aug. 16, 1862 – During the Civil War, the Dakota (Sioux) uprising began when Minnesota erupted in violence as desperate Dakota Indians attacked white settlements along the Minnesota River. The Dakota were eventually overwhelmed by the U.S. military six weeks later.

Aug. 16, 1863 – During the Civil War, the Chickamauga Campaign began and continued until Sept. 22.

Aug. 16, 1863 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Harrison's Landing, Ark. and at Falls Church, Va.

Aug. 16, 1864 - Confederate General John Chambliss was killed during a cavalry charge at Deep Bottom, Va., one of the sieges of Petersburg. His body was recovered by a former West Point classmate, Union General David Gregg, who made a surprising discovery: a detailed map of the Richmond defenses. Copies of the map were distributed to all Union officers in the area within 48 hours, and it may not have helped the Union capture Richmond–that would take another seven months–but it may have reduced casualties by preventing foolhardy attacks on well-defended positions.

Aug. 16, 1864 - Union General Philip Sheridan pulled back from Winchester, Va. to wait for reinforcements.

Aug. 16, 1864 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Richland Creek, Ark. and near Columbia, Mo.

Aug. 16, 1879 – In a habeas corpus proceeding in Monroe County, Ala. on this day, Judge Henry sustained Judge Sowell’s decision in the murder case involving Charles Roberts and D.W. Rankin. Henry agreed that Sowell had the legal right to re-arrest Roberts and try him for murder.

Aug. 16, 1886 - The thermometer registered 100 degrees in the shade on this Monday in Monroeville, according to The Monroe Journal.

Aug. 16, 1886 - The Monroeville Post Office was authorized on this Monday to begin issuing Postal Notes and Money Orders.

Aug. 16, 1886 - A “Rain Bow” party was given at the residence of Emma Seymours on this Monday night, according to The Monroe Journal.

Aug. 16, 1888 – Thomas Edward Lawrence, aka “Lawrence of Arabia,” was born in Tremadoc, Wales. “T.E.,” as he liked to be called, was an archaeologist and scholar and military strategist. His book “The Seven Pillars of Wisdom (1926) was an account of his exploits as a military advisor to Arabs in their revolt against the Turks, and was the basis for the film “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962).

Aug. 16, 1892 - Glorvina Johnston Rush passed away at the age of 74 and is buried in the McIntosh Cemetery. In 1860, she and her husband donated the land where Andrews Chapel was constructed in McIntosh, Ala.

Aug. 16, 1896 – Skookum Jim Mason, George Carmack and Dawson Charlie discovered gold in a tributary of the Klondike River in Canada, setting off the Klondike Gold Rush.

Aug. 16, 1904 - Alabama author Prentiss Ingraham died in Biloxi, Miss.

Aug. 16, 1906 – The Monroe Journal reported, in news from the Jones Mill, Ala. community, that W.L. Middleton was “rearing up a fine, two-story dwelling at this place which will be quite a handsome building when completed.”

Aug. 16, 1908 – Novelist and editor William Maxwell was born in Lincoln, Ill.

Aug. 16, 1911 – The Evergreen Courant reported that E.C. Lee was preparing to erect a handsome two-story residence on the site of his present home on Main and Shipp streets. J. Golightly was the contractor.

Aug. 16, 1916 – Evergreen’s baseball team beat Belleville, 19-9, on this Wednesday in Evergreen, Ala.

Aug. 16, 1917 – The Monroe Journal reported that A.C. Lee and Q. Salter were business visitors to New Orleans during the previous week.

Aug. 16, 1917 – The Monroe Journal reported that Miss Jennie Faulk had left a few days before for Atlanta to select her fall stock of millinery.

Aug. 16, 1917 – The Monroe Journal reported that the work of demolishing the old grammar school building was well advanced and the material for the new brick structure was arriving. Dirt was to be broken for the erection of the new edifice within a few days and the building was to be rushed to completion as rapidly as possible. It was hoped to have it ready for occupancy by the usual date for the opening of the school term.

Aug. 16, 1917 – The Monroe Journal reported that, after canvassing a portion of the county, Prof. W.L. Porter reported the prospects favorable for a prosperous opening of the seventh annual session of the Monroe County High School on Sept. 10. Practically all undergraduates in school during the previous session signified their intention of returning, while a number of public school pupils who were awarded seventh grade certificates at the recent examinations would probably enter the High School during its next session.

Aug. 16, 1917 – The Monroe Journal reported that the Rev. A.J. Kempton had accepted calls to the pastorate of the Baptist churches at Excel and Ollie for the remainder of the year. The Ollie church was served on the afternoon of the first Sabbath in each month; Excel, morning and evening of the second Sunday. The appointment at Roy on the third Sunday, morning and evening, was to be continued unchanged.

Aug. 16, 1917 - In a renewed thrust of the Allied offensive launched at the end of July in the Flanders region of Belgium—known as the Third Battle of Ypres, or simply as Passchendaele, for the village that saw the heaviest fighting—British troops captured the village of Langemarck from the Germans.

Aug. 16, 1920 – Ray Chapman of the Cleveland Indians was hit on the temple by a fastball thrown by Carl Mays of the New York Yankees, and died early the next day. Chapman was the second player to die from injuries sustained in a Major League Baseball game, the first being Doc Powers in 1909.

Aug. 16, 1920 – Poet Charles Bukowski was born in Andernach, Germany.

Aug. 16, 1930 – Pro Football Hall of Fame halfback and flanker Frank Gifford was born in Santa Monica, Calif. He went on to play for Southern Cal and the New York Giants. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1977.

Aug. 16, 1942 – During World War II, the two-person crew of the U.S. naval blimp L-8 disappeared without a trace on a routine anti-submarine patrol over the Pacific Ocean. The blimp drifted without her crew and crash-landed in Daly City, Calif.

Aug. 16, 1943 – NFL guard Woody Peoples was born in Birmingham, Ala. He went on to play for Grambling, the San Francisco 49ers and the Philadelphia Eagles.

Aug. 16, 1945 – The National Representatives' Congress, the precursor of the National Assembly of Vietnam, convened in Sơn Dương.

Aug. 16, 1948 – National Baseball Hall of Fame outfielder and pitcher George Herman "Babe" Ruth died from throat cancer in New York City at the age of 53 and was buried in Hawthorne, N.Y. During his career, he played for the Boston Red Sox, the New York Yankees and the Boston Braves. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1936.

Aug. 16, 1950 - Monroe County High School Coach LeVaughn Hanks announced on this Wednesday that football practice for the 1950 MCHS team would get underway on Mon., Aug. 20, at 9 a.m. at the high school in Monroeville. Equipment was to be issued at that time and Coach Hanks urged all candidates to be on hand.

Aug. 16, 1951 - Alabama author Judy Troy was born in Chicago, Ill.

Aug. 16, 1954 - Sports Illustrated was published for the first time. It was claimed that 250,000 subscriptions had been sold before the first issue came off of the presses.

Aug. 16, 1956 – The Evergreen Courant reported that one of the smallest squads in recent years was to greet head coach Wendell Hart on Fri., Aug. 24, when initial football drills were to begin at Evergreen High School. Hart expected about 30 boys out, but there would several more by the time school opened in September. The squad was expected to be one of the shortest on manpower, depth and experience to represent the local school in the previous five years. Only six lettermen were returning from 1955’s fine team, five linemen and only one back. Returning lettermen were Captain Wayne Frazier, tackle, alternate captain Russell Deason, tackle, James Nelson, guard, Bert Cook, end, Mickey Joyner, end, and Bert Tuggle, halfback. Opening drills would be limited to conditioning workouts with the boys really getting down to the hard work about the middle of the following week. As soon as the boys got into shape, the work would be long and hard as there would be only a little over two weeks after the first practice until the tough season’s opener with Atmore. As of this date, there still was no replacement to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of assistant coach John Robinson, who resigned the previous week. There was an extreme shortage of both teachers and coaches across the state at that time.

Aug. 16, 1956 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Miss Willie Anna Hanks, daughter of Mrs. Opal Hanks of Annex, was chosen Conecuh County Maid of Cotton at the annual Farm Bureau meeting in Evergreen during the previous week. Miss Nell Freeman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Freeman of Old Town, was chosen alternate.

Aug. 16, 1956 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the battle for dominance in the Evergreen Senior Baseball League continued close all the way as only one game separated the leading Barons and the cellar-dwelling Chicks. The Crackers and the Bears were tied for second place with even .500 averages, only a half game off the pace. Howard Claybrook led the batters in the League with a .650 average closely followed by Bill Ivey with a .642 and Robert Ellington with an even .600. Other leading batters included Byron Warren Jr., .467; George Bolton, .467; Gordon Sims, .454; Dale Wiggins, .442; Gerald Howington, .388; Billie Grace, .367; and Leland Burgess, .317.

Aug. 16, 1956 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Castleberry’s municipal election was to be held on Sept. 17, according to an announcement by Mayor Jack Holland. Officers to be elected in the general election were to include the mayor and five councilmen. Qualifying began on Aug. 8, and was to remain open until Aug. 28. No primary was to be held that year. Incumbents were: mayor, Jack Holland; councilmen, Joe H. Carr, B.H. Mahoney, Henry Kirksey, R.T. Baggett and C.J. Jackson. Up to Aug. 16, only one man had qualified for office. Hassett Green had qualified for mayor. He owned a grocery store in Castleberry, and was a retired electrician. He was a well known and respected citizen of Castleberry.

Aug. 16, 1959 - Dial telephone service was expected to go into operation on this Sunday in Monroeville. Plans were proceeding for the conversion of local phones from the common battery system to a dial exchange on Saturday night (Aug. 15), Miss Myrtle Fore, secretary, Monroeville Telephone Co., said on Wed., Aug. 12. Conversion to the dial exchange in Monroeville was expected to cut in half the number of 22 operators employed at that time. Fore stated directories would be mailed on Wed., Aug. 12, listing numbers on all dial exchanges in the county.

Aug. 16, 1960 – The Evergreen (Ala.) Quarterback Club was scheduled to meet at the Recreation Center at 7:30 p.m. in Evergreen, Ala.

Aug. 16, 1962 – The famous lineup of The Beatles was formed when drummer Pete Best was discharged from the band, and Ringo Starr was brought on.

Aug. 16, 1964 – During the Vietnam War, a coup d'état replaced Dương Văn Minh with General Nguyễn Khánh as President of South Vietnam, and a new constitution was established with aid from the U.S. Embassy.

Aug. 16, 1964 – Groundbreaking services were held for a new education building at the Monroeville (Ala.) Presbyterian Church. W.P. Dennis, the oldest member of the church, turned the first shovel of dirt at the ceremonies. Rev. V.O. Titterud, pastor, then gave prayer and blessed the undertaking. Construction began the following day.

Aug. 16, 1966 – During the Vietnam War, the House Un-American Activities Committee began investigations of Americans who had aided the Viet Cong.

Aug. 16, 1967 - President Johnson’s broad interpretation of the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution was attacked in the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee by the Chairman, Senator William Fulbright of Arkansas, who felt that Johnson had no mandate to conduct the war on the present scale.

Aug. 16, 1972 - U.S. fighter-bombers flew 370 air strikes against North Vietnam, the highest daily total of the year; additionally, there were eight B-52 strikes in the North. Meanwhile, U.S. warplanes flew 321 missions (including 27 B-52 strikes) in South Vietnam, mostly in Quang Tri province. Despite this heavy air activity, hopes for an agreement to end the war rose as Henry Kissinger left Paris to confer with President Thieu and his advisers.

Aug. 16, 1977 - Elvis Presley died at the age of 42 in Memphis, Tenn. of coronary arrhythmia.

Aug. 16, 1981 - Cal Ripken Jr. got his first Major League hit.

Aug. 16, 1981 – Law enforcement officers seized over 500 marijuana stalks, three to eight feet tall, from a location about five miles from Evergreen, Ala. on this Sunday morning. The marijuana had a street value of about $116,000 and a wholesale value of about $60,000. Law enforcement officers taking part in the seizure included ABC Agent George Grantt, Conecuh County Sheriff Edwin Booker, ABC Agent Bobby Davis, Evergreen police officers Johnny Blackmon and James Powell and Chief Deputy Sheriff Leroy Ferrell.

Aug. 16, 1983 – National Baseball Hall of Fame center fielder Earl Averill passed away in Everett, Wash. at the age of 81. During his career, he played for the Cleveland Indians, the Detroit Tigers and the Boston Braves. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975.

Aug. 16, 1988 – Jeff Kimbro was named the Most Valuable Player of the Evergreen (Ala.) Junior Baseball League’s American League Division.

Aug. 16, 1988 – The Evergreen City Council accepted a low bid from Taylor Construction of Atmore for the construction of a new hangar at Middleton Field Municipal Airport in Evergreen, Ala.

Aug. 16, 1989 – A geomagnetic storm shut down Toronto’s stock market.

Aug. 16, 1990 – The Monroe County (Ala.) Board of Education approved the resignation of George Coker, the assistant principal at J.F. Shields High School in Beatrice.

Aug. 16, 1996 - In Monterrey, Mexico, the New York Mets played the San Diego Padres, and the Padres won, 15-10. It was the first-ever regular season Major League Baseball game to be played outside the United States and Canada.

Aug. 16, 2002 - The Major League Baseball players union announced that they would begin a strike on August 30.

Aug. 16, 2002 - U.S. President George W. Bush commented on the strike date set by Major League Baseball players. He said, "The baseball owners and baseball players must understand if there is a work stoppage, a lot of fans are going to be furious, and I'm one of them." The players had set a strike date of August 30 earlier in the day.

Aug. 16, 2002 - Curt Shilling of the Arizona Diamondbacks won his 20th game of the year.

Aug. 16, 2003 - Jimmy Smith of the Jacksonville Jaguars was suspended four games by the NFL for violating the league's substance abuse policy.

Aug. 16, 2003 - Michael Vick of the Atlanta Falcons suffered a fractured right fibula in a 13-10 preseason loss to the Baltimore Ravens.


Aug. 16, 2014 – Mandy Stokes, John Stokes, Kevin Jenkins, Savannah Jenkins and Parker Jenkins, all of Thomaston, Ala., killed a 15-foot-long, 1,011.5-pound alligator that set the state record for largest alligator legally killed in Alabama. They initially hooked the gator around 10:30 p.m. on Aug. 15 in a creek several miles above Millers Ferry Dam in Wilcox County and battled it for five hours before finally killing it.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The Evergreen Courant's News Flashback for Aug. 15, 2017

Benjamin M. Miller
11 YEARS AGO
AUG. 17, 2006

Evergreen weather observer Harry Ellis reported .55 inches of rain on Aug. 8 and .08 inches on Aug. 13. He reported highs of 96 degrees on Aug. 7, Aug. 8, Aug. 9 and Aug. 12 and lows of 70 degrees on Aug. 9 and Aug. 10.

Television venture by Sheriff Hawsey draws ethics questions: Conecuh County Sheriff Tracy Hawsey has found himself in the midst of a controversy over a television show he and WAKA CBS 8 reporter Mike Smith have created called “Alabama 9-1-1.” Articles that appeared in the Mobile Press-Register this week allege that Hawsey has a conflict and could be in violation of ethics laws in the state.
Sheriff Hawsey claims that he has already discussed the matter with the Secretary of State’s office and they had no problems.

Bobby Balogun, President of W&B Trading, appeared before the Conecuh County Commission to voice his displeasure with the progress in acquiring the land and other incentives promised him by the county and City of Evergreen to bring his biodiesel plant to Conecuh County. Balogun began by saying his company is happy to be in Conecuh County and feels like the county has welcomed him here.
He told the county there are several issues they are not happy with on the project. He stated that since the contract for the project was signed on June 8 too much time has passed without activity on items like the temporary industrial access road to the site.

36 YEARS AGO
AUG. 20, 1981

Evergreen weather observer Earl Windham reported 0.56 inches of rain on Aug. 10, 0.04 inches on Aug. 13 and 0.12 on Aug. 16. He reported a high of 96 degrees on Aug. 16 and a low of 68 on Aug. 11.

C. of C. moves into The Depot: The Evergreen Chamber of Commerce has moved its offices into the “agent’s office” of the historical L&N Depot, it is announced today by President Bill McKenzie. The C. of C. has had its offices in the old library building.
Mrs. Jackie Barlow, secretary, will continue to maintain the same hours, 8 a.m. to 12 noon, Monday through Friday.
The Chamber has also taken over the management of The Depot, according to Mrs. Wiley (Ouida) Salter of the Murder Creek Historical Society, although the Society will continue to own the building.

Civil Court term will begin Monday: The Fall Term of Circuit Court, Conecuh County, will begin Monday morning at nine o’clock at the County Courthouse here. Circuit Judge Robert E.L. Key will preside and after Court is opened will empanel the Grand Jury, following which trial of the cases on the Civil Bar Docket will begin.
The Grand Jury will be assisted in its deliberations by District Attorney Ted Pearson of Monroeville and Assistant District Attorney David T. Hyde Jr. of Evergreen.
There are a total of 17 cases on the Civil Docket, according to Circuit Clerk Mrs. Jean Ralls.

61 YEARS AGO
AUG. 16, 1956

Conecuh’s First Bales Auctioned Saturday: Conecuh’s first two bales of cotton were auctioned off Saturday afternoon in Evergreen for the fancy price of 43 cents per pound. The two bales were purchased by Kendall and Kendall of Evergreen.
The first two bales were ginned this year on Aug. 4 at Evergreen Gin. Arriving almost simultaneously in the race for first bale honors were Grady Ralls of Evergreen, Route D, and J.T. Ward of Evergreen, Route C.

Conecuh’s New Maid of Cotton and Alternate: Shown above, right, is Miss Willie Anna Hanks, daughter of Mrs. Opal Hanks of Annex, who was chosen Conecuh County Maid of Cotton at the annual Farm Bureau meeting here last week. At left is Miss Nell Freeman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Freeman of Old Town, who was chosen alternate.

Castleberry’s municipal election will be held on Sept. 17, according to an announcement today by Mayor Jack Holland.
Officers to be elected in the general election will be the mayor and the five councilmen.
Qualifying began on Aug. 8, and will be open until Aug. 28. No primary will be held this year.
Incumbents are: mayor, Jack Holland; councilmen, Joe H. Carr, B.H. Mahoney, Henry Kirksey, R.T. Baggett and C.J. Jackson.
So far, only one man has qualified for office. Hassett Green has qualified for mayor. He owns a grocery store in Castleberry, and is a retired electrician. He is a well known and respected citizen of Castleberry.

86 YEARS AGO
AUG. 13, 1931

HERE’S A PRIZE STORY, ‘BELIEVE IT OR NOT’: Mr. J.H. Dickerson, well known farmer living about five miles north of Evergreen, informs a representative of The Courant that a phenomenal incident occurred at his home last Wednesday afternoon. While seated on his back porch, watching a heavy downpour of rain, he suddenly was attracted to a small object about the size of a man’s fist which had fallen, apparently out of the clouds with the heavy rains. Closer observation disclosed that it was a terrapin. Mr. Dickerson says that the fall stunned the creature to such extent that it did not seem to have much life and later was able to make his or her departure down through the field nearby.
Mr. Dickerson says that he saw the terrapin when it hit the ground and he is positive that it fell out of the clouds just as did the rain. In his mind there is no doubt about it. It is his opinion that the little animal was picked up somewhere by a storm and brought that far before being dropped.

Gov. B.M. Miller late Thursday, Aug. 6, appointed Leonard W. Price of this city Probate Judge of Conecuh County to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Judge S.P. Dunn.

Cap Edson and son, Hubert, are lodged in the county jail charged with the murder of Jim Merritt, brother-in-law of Edson, the killing having occurred in the vicinity of Grange Bridge on Pigeon Creek shortly after 12 o’clock Tuesday.
According to reports, the difficulty arose over the shooting of some cows, Edson having accused Merritt of doing the shooting. The trouble had been brewing for about a week it seems. Merritt and another brother-in-law, Andrew Terry, were returning from Red Level when the trouble ended in the fatal killing. Merritt were cut twice, once in the breast, the gash severing a rib and entering the heart, the other on the arm. He died almost instantly it is said.

Today in History for Aug. 15, 2017

Aug. 15, 1057 – King Macbeth was killed at the Battle of Lumphanan by the forces of Máel Coluim mac Donnchada.


Aug. 15, 1754 – Federal Indian agent Benjamin Hawkins was born in Warren County, N.C.

Aug. 15, 1771 – Sir Walter Scott, the father of the historical novel, was born in Edinburgh.

Aug. 15, 1780 - American Lieutenant Colonel Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox,” and his irregular cavalry force of 250 routed a party of Loyalists commanded by Major Micajah Gainey at Port’s Ferry, S.C.

Aug. 15, 1785 – Essayist Thomas de Quincey was born in Manchester, England.

Aug. 15, 1799 - The Rev. Isaac Hadden was born in Abbeville County, S.C. Hadden was one of Alabama’s first Presbyterian ministers and he was ordained an evangelist in Montgomery on March 24, 1825. Hadden eventually passed away at the age of 50 in Sumter County, Ala., and he’s buried at Bethel Presbyterian Cemetery in Sumterville in Sumter County, Ala.

Aug. 15, 1814 – During the War of 1812, at the Siege of Fort Erie, Edmund P. Gaines, who arrested former Vice President Aaron Burr near Fort Stoddert in Alabama, was in command on the fortifications at Fort Erie when a British assault was bloodily repulsed.

Aug. 15, 1824 – Marquis de Lafayette, the last surviving French general of the American Revolutionary War, arrived in Staten Island, N.Y., beginning his historic tour of the 24 United States.

Aug. 15, 1841 - Julia Tutwiler was born in Tuscaloosa. Tutwiler, president of what later became the University of West Alabama, worked to secure the admittance of women to the University of Alabama, to reform Alabama's prisons, and to expand educational opportunities for women.

Aug. 15, 1842 – Gillchrist R. Boulware was born near Conecuh County’s Brooklyn community. He first entered Confederate service as a private on April 1, 1861 at Sparta in Co. E of the 4th Ala. Inf. and continued as a private until Dec. 13, 1862, when he was elected 1st Lt. and served until Jan. 11, 1864. He served in the secret service department from Jan. 11, 1864 until the end of the war in 1865.

Aug. 15, 1859 – National Baseball Hall of Fame first baseman, manager and owner Charles Albert Comiskey, namesake of Chicago’s famous Comiskey Park, was born in Chicago, Ill. During his career, he played for the St. Louis Brown Stockings/Browns, the Chicago Pirates and the Cincinnati Reds and managed the Browns, the Pirates and Reds. He owned the Chicago White Sox from 1901 to 1931 and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1939.

Aug. 15, 1861 - Union and Confederate forces clashed near Fredericktown and Kirkville, Mo.

Aug. 15, 1861 - General George McClellan assumed command of the Army of the Potomac.

Aug. 15, 1861 – During the Civil War, just months after he surrendered Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Union General Robert Anderson was named commander of the Department of Kentucky and carefully maintained the balance of neutrality in the state. But poor health forced him to resign his command two months later, and William T. Sherman replaced him. Anderson returned to active duty briefly in 1865 to hoist the American flag over Fort Sumter after the Confederate surrender. He died in 1871 and was buried at West Point.

Aug. 15, 1862 – During the Civil War, Confederate forces occupied Port Hudson, La.

Aug. 15, 1863 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Hartwood Church and Beverly Ford in Virginia; and at Bentonville, Ark.

Aug. 15, 1863 – During the Civil War, Union General William S. Rosecrans moved his army south from Tullahoma, Tenn. to attack Confederate forces in Chattanooga.

Aug. 15, 1864 – During the Civil War, a Union raid began on the Florida railroad and continued through Aug. 19.

Aug. 15, 1864 – During the Civil War, an engagement took place at Cedarville, Va.; and combats occurred at Deep Run, White's Tavern, on the Charles City Road, Bailey's Creek, Fussell's Mill and Gravel Hill in Virginia.

Aug. 15, 1864 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Carrollton, Ark.; at Fairburn and Sandtown in Georgia; and near Charlestown, W.Va.

Aug. 15, 1864 – During the Civil War, Union General Philip Sheridan pulled back from Winchester, Va. to wait for reinforcements.

Aug. 15, 1864 – During the Civil War, Confederate General John Chambliss was killed during a cavalry charge at Deep Bottom Run, Va. In an attempt to regain control of a section of trenches breached by the Yankees, the Confederates counterattacked, and Chambliss was killed. His body was recovered by a former West Point classmate, Union General David Gregg, who made a surprising discovery: a detailed map of the Richmond defenses. Gregg gave the plan to Union topographical engineers, who then looked for a way to copy and distribute the map through the army's command structure. Using a new photographic technique known as Margedant's Quick Method, which did not require a camera, the engineers traced Chambliss's map and laid it over a sheet of photographic paper. The paper was then exposed to the sun's rays, which darkened the paper except under the traced lines. The result was a mass-produced negative of the map, which was distributed to all Union officers in the area within 48 hours. It may not have helped the Union capture Richmond—that would take another seven months—but it may have reduced casualties by preventing foolhardy attacks on well-defended positions.

Aug. 15, 1885 – Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and playwright Edna Ferber was born in Kalamazoo, Mich.

Aug. 15, 1889 – The Lower Warehouse at Claiborne, Ala. shipped two bales of new cotton on this day, the first of the season. The bales, which weighed 540 pounds and 610 pounds, were raised by W.S. Moore.

Aug. 15, 1893 – Writer and wit Dorothy Parker was born Dorothy Rothschild in Long Branch, New Jersey.

Aug. 15, 1896 – Axel’s baseball team beat Mexia, 17-7, at Axel on this Saturday afternoon.


Aug. 15, 1896 - Chas. L. Scott of Mount Pleasant and L.W. Locklin of Perdue Hill visited Monroeville on this Saturday.

Aug. 15, 1906 - Belleville and Evergreen baseball teams played in Evergreen on this Wednesday, and Evergreen defeated Belleville, 19-9.

Aug. 15, 1911 - W.O. Hudson, who lived near Evergreen, Ala., brought in the first bale of cotton raised in Conecuh County that season. The bale weighed 371 pounds and brought $40 or about 11 cents per pound. The J.H. Farnham Mercantile Co. purchased to cotton.

Aug. 15, 1914 – On the final day of the Monroe County Masonic Conference at Franklin, a new Masonic lodge hall was formally dedicated and a “very large crowd” watched the cornerstone and dedication ceremonies, which were conducted by the Rev. D.B. Dismukes, F.S. Dailey, J.J. Dunn, G.A. Harris, W.G. McCorvey, W.S. Nash, Reuben Perry, Robert McCants, P.S. McKinley, J.J. McMillan, J.J. Sessions and A.C. Lee.

Aug. 15, 1914 - The Panama Canal was officially opened to commercial traffic as an American ship sailed from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean. The first vessel to pass through the canal was the American cargo and passenger ship SS Ancon.

Aug. 15, 1914 – Baseball teams from the Franklin and Chance communities played a doubleheader at Franklin, and Franklin won both games, 6-3 and 8-7.

Aug. 15, 1914 – During World War I, the First Russian Army, led by Paul von Rennenkampf, entered East Prussia.

Aug. 15, 1914 – During World War I, the Battle of Cer began and resulted in the first Allied victory of World War I.

Aug. 15, 1914 – During World War I, the government of Japan sent an ultimatum to Germany, demanding the removal of all German ships from Japanese and Chinese waters and the surrender of control of Tsingtao—the location of Germany’s largest overseas naval bases, located on China’s Shantung Peninsula—to Japan by noon on August 23.

Aug. 15, 1916 - Capt. H.L. McDuffie, who held a commission in the Alabama National Guard service, was in Monroeville on this Tuesday looking after recruits.

Aug. 15, 1917 - M.T. Johnston and family were at Castleberry on this Wednesday where Mr. Johnston attended the Masonic conference.

Aug. 15, 1917 - Friends at Peterman and surrounding communities learned with sincere regret of the death of Joseph Monroe Dees, 66, of Peterman at a hospital in Selma on this Wednesday at four o’clock following an operation. The remains reached Peterman the following day, where they were laid to rest by Revs. Lindsey and Williams and a large number of friends. Born on Dec. 3, 1850, he was buried in the Rumbley Cemetery.

Aug. 15, 1918 - Alabama author Edward Kimbrough was born in Meridian, Miss.

Aug. 15, 1920 – Science fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury was born in Waukegan, Ill.

Aug. 15-30, 1925 – The Alabama National Guard’s Troop C of the 55th Machine Gun Squadron in Evergreen, Ala. was scheduled to go to camp at Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.

Aug. 15, 1930 – Confederate veteran Greenberry “Green” Henry Shell died at the age of 88 in Brewton, Ala. and was buried in the Cooper Cemetery at Appleton. Born in Georgia on Oct. 17, 1841, he later moved to Escambia County, Ala. and the community of Appleton was named for his apple orchard. The name, a combination of “apple” and “-ton,” which means “town,” was suggested by Shell’s son, Andrew (April 5, 1886-Feb. 25, 1945). The Appleton post office was established in 1901. Greenberry Shell was also a Civil War veteran, having served in Co. D, 16th Regt., Ala. Inf., CSA.

Aug. 15, 1935 - A movie version of Alabama author Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews' “The Perfect Tribute was released.

Aug. 15, 1935 – Humorist Will Rogers and pilot Wiley Post were killed in a plane crash while flying from Fairbanks, Alaska to Point Barrow. The two men were world famous: Post for being the first pilot to fly solo around the world, and Rogers for his rope tricks and his pithy newspaper column.

Aug. 15, 1935 – Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Annie Prouulx was born Edna Ann Proulx in Norwich, Conn.

Aug. 15, 1935 – The Monroe Journal reported that Miss Alice Nettles, the daughter of Mrs. Jewell D. Nettles of Monroeville, who was attending the summer session of the Feagin School of Dramatic Art in New York City, would play an important role the following week in “The Distaff Side” by John Van Druten. The performance was to take place in the 57th Street Playhouse, the theatre of the school, at 316 West 57th St., New York City.

Aug. 15, 1935 – The Monroe Journal reported, in news from the Beatrice community, that Prof. Brock was busy getting ready for the opening of school here, which was to begin early in September.

Aug. 15, 1935 – The Monroe Journal reported that Mrs. H.A. Drake, the mother of Mrs. Erastus Talbert, had been confined to the King Memorial Hospital in Selma, for two weeks with a broken arm.

Aug. 15, 1936 – Construction of the new Conecuh County High School building in Castleberry, Ala., which began on Feb. 11, was finished at a total cost of $48,500. Designed by Dittmar and Roberts of Montgomery and Mobile and built by contractor Henry I. Flynn of Montgomery, final inspection was completed on Aug. 19. Marvin Hanks, the County Superintendent of Education, served as county supervisor of the building during its construction.

Aug. 15, 1939 - "The Wizard of Oz" premiered at Grauman’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood, Calif. Judy Garland became famous for the movie's song "Somewhere Over the Rainbow."

Aug. 15, 1945 - The Allies proclaimed V-J Day a day after Japan agreed to surrender unconditionally.

Aug. 15, 1945 – Pro Football Hall of Fame left guard was born in Robstown, Texas. He went on to play for Texas A&M-Kingsville and the Oakland Raiders. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1987.

Aug. 15, 1948 – Novelist Denise Chavez was born in Las Cruces, New Mexico, a town just 40 miles from the Mexican border.

Aug. 15, 1950 – Army SFC N.L. Rickard, 22, of Monroe County, Ala. was killed in action in Korea. Born on Dec. 9, 1922, he was buried in the Edgemont Cemetery in Anniston in Calhoun County, Ala. Rickhard also served in World War II, and he was a member of Co. B, 34th Infantry, 24th Infantry Division at the time of his death.

Aug. 15, 1951 – The Evergreen Courant reported that the contracts for construction of the new 15,000 KW steam electric power generating plant to be built by Alabama Electric Cooperative at Gantt in Covington County, Ala. were to be awarded within six weeks. The announcement was made that week, following a meeting of the Alabama Electric Cooperative board of directors.

Aug. 15, 1952 – Hank Williams performed two concerts at Greenville Stadium in Greenville, Ala., one starting at 3 p.m. with the second following at 8 p.m.

Aug. 15, 1954 – Swedish journalist and novelist Stieg Larsson was born in Skelleftehamn.

Aug. 15, 1961 – Permanent construction began on the Berlin Wall.

Aug. 15, 1962 – On this Wednesday, two members of one family were killed when their 1957 Ford Station Wagon skidded on wet pavement and hit a pulp wood truck broadside. Ralph W. Richardson, driver of the car, lost control about five miles north of Evergreen on U.S. 31. His wife, Louise, 31, was killed along with their five-year-old son, Paul. Richardson suffered severe injuries and his two surviving children, Kathleen, eight, and Steve, three, were also badly injured. Their car rammed into a 1957 GMC Pulpwood truck driven by James Taylor of Georgiana.

Aug. 15, 1963 – Leroy, Ala. native Emanuel King was born. He would go on to star in football at Leroy High School, the University of Alabama and with the Cincinnati Bengals and Los Angeles Raiders after being selected in the first round of the 1985 NFL Draft.

Aug. 15, 1965 - The Beatles set a record for having the largest single crowd at a concert at Shea Stadium in New York. Attendance was 56,000.

Aug. 15, 1966 – Preseason football practice began at Evergreen High School and Atmore High School. The two teams were scheduled to open the season against one another on Thurs., Sept. 8, at Brooks Stadium in Evergreen, Ala. Morris Ward was Evergreen’s principal.

Aug. 15, 1966 – George Edward Weems, 49, of Piedmont, who was believed to have been a “hobo,” was killed during a train derailment around 7:30 a.m. near Owassa, Ala. Over 30 cars of the long freight train derailed and overturned in a curve on the L&N Railroad tracks, and Weems was found dead in the wreckage. It was believed that Weems and two other men were hitching a ride on the train, but no trace of the other two men was found. Weems, who was born in 1917, was buried in the Crestwood Memorial Cemetery in East Gadsden, Etowah County, Ala. According to the Aug. 16, 1966 edition of the Gadsden Times, Weems was killed at Owassa when a car from a derailed L&N freight train turned over on him as he was walking alongside the track.

Aug. 15, 1968 - Heavy fighting intensified in and around the DMZ, as South Vietnamese and U.S. troops engaged a North Vietnamese battalion.

Aug. 15, 1969 - The Woodstock Music and Art Fair began in Bethel, N.Y. A half million concertgoers descended upon Max Yasgur's 600-acre dairy farm in rural Bethel, New York to listen to performing artists that included Joan Baez, Santana, Janis Joplin, and Jimi Hendrix.

Aug. 15, 1970 - Mrs. Pat Palinkas became the first woman to ‘play’ in a pro football game when she held the ball for the Orlando, Panthers.

Aug. 15, 1970 - South Vietnamese officials reported that regional forces killed 308 Communist troops in four days of heavy fighting along a coastal strip south of the DMZ.

Aug. 15, 1971 - In South Vietnam, North Vietnamese troops increased operations along the DMZ.

Aug. 15, 1971 - Mark Booker killed a big, five-feet-long rattlesnake on this Sunday afternoon inside the house at the old Mark Booker place in the China community. The snake had tree rattles and a button.

Aug. 15, 1973 – Dr. Sam Granade’s resignation as pastor at Evergreen Baptist Church was scheduled to take effect. Granade had been pastor at the church for 25 years before he announced his resignation on July 1.

Aug. 15, 1973 – During the Vietnam War, the United States bombing of Cambodia ended.

Aug. 15, 1977 – Jerry R. Ehman detected the “Wow! Signal,” a strong narrowband radio signal that bore the expected hallmarks of non-terrestrial and non-Solar System origin. At the time, Ehman was working on a SETI project at the Big Ear radio telescope of Ohio State University, then located at Ohio Wesleyan University's Perkins Observatory in Delaware, Ohio. The “Wow! Signal” lasted for the full 72-second window that Big Ear was able to observe it, but has not been detected again.

Aug. 15, 1980 - There was to be a meeting of the Lyeffion Saddle Club at 7:30 on this Friday night at Lyeffion High School at the Vo-Ag Education Dept. Important business, both old and new, that needed prompt attention was to be on the agenda. All members of the club and persons interested in the Club’s Arena were invited and urged to attend.

Aug. 15, 1984 - Pete Rose returned to become player and manager of the Cincinnati Reds. He had been away from his hometown for six years. Rose had been in Philadelphia and Montreal.

Aug. 15, 1988 - Barring another delay, two men indicted in the murder of Monroeville resident Ronda Morrison were scheduled to go on trial on this Monday in Baldwin County. Witnesses in the case of Walter “Johnny D” McMillian of Route 1, Repton, and Ralph Bernard Myers of Route 2, Evergreen, had been subpoenaed to be at the Bay Minette courthouse at 1 p.m. on this Monday. Both cases were on the day’s docket, and it wouldn’t be determined until then which will go on trial first, said Larry Ikner, investigator with the Monroe County district attorney’s office. Miss Morrison, 18, was killed Nov. 1, 1986 during a robbery at Jackson Cleaners on South Alabama Avenue, where she worked.

Aug. 15, 1990 – Preseason football practice began at Monroe County High School and Excel, Frisco City, J.U. Blacksher and J.F. Shields high schools in Monroe County, Ala.

Aug. 15, 1990 - Mark McGwire hit a grand slam in the tenth inning to become the first Major League Baseball player to hit 30 or more homers in his first four seasons. The Oakland Athletics beat the Boston Red Sox, 6-2.

Aug. 15, 1993 - Nolan Ryan got his 324th and final victory. The Texas Rangers beat the Indians, 4-1.

Aug. 15, 1993 - Author Sara Elizabeth Mason died in Homewood, Ala.

Aug. 15, 1994 – Belleville native Don D. Crum, an Air Force veteran of World War II and the Korean War, passed away at the age of 74 at the Keesler Air Force Base Hospital in Mississippi. He was buried in Magnolia Cemetery in Evergreen, Ala.

Aug. 15, 1995 – The Baltimore Orioles beat the Cleveland Indians, 8-3, at Camden Yards. Attendance was 46,346, including me.

Aug. 15, 1996 – The Evergreen Courant reported that James “Grease” Gross recently competed in a Tough Man Contest in Monroeville, Ala. After defeating his first two opponents with first round knockouts, he then went to the championship fight, which turned out to be the highlight of the night for the Lightweight Division (110 pounds to 160 pounds). The fight was scheduled for three rounds, but it turned into an eight-round battle to the end. The decision was a draw, and Gross and his opponent split the prize winnings and received a trophy.

Aug. 15, 1996 – The Evergreen Courant reported that city electrical crews were working to upgrade another portion of the city’s electrical system from 4KV to 12KV to “take some of the strain off the system.”

Aug. 15, 1997 - The U.S. Justice Department decided not to prosecute FBI officials in connection with the deadly 1992 Ruby Ridge siege in Idaho. The investigation dealt with an alleged cover-up.

Aug. 15, 1997 - Dan Wilson hit the 3,000th Seattle Mariners homerun.

Aug. 15, 1997 - The Los Angeles Dodgers retired Tommy Lasorda's No. 2 jersey

Aug. 15, 1999 - Alabama author Celestine Sibley died in Dog Island, Fla.

Aug. 15, 2001 - Chandra Levy's parents appeared on CNN's "Larry King Live." They discussed Levy's disappearance on April 30, 2001.


Aug. 15, 2013 – The Smithsonian announced the discovery of the olinguito, the first new carnivoran species found in the Americas in 35 years.

Daily Rainfall Observations from SW Alabama for Tues., Aug. 15, 2017

Rainfall (Past 24 Hours): 0.50 inches.

Week to Date Rainfall: 0.50 inches.

Month to Date Rainfall:  5.45 inches.

Summer to Date Rainfall: 21.80 inches.

Year to Date Rainfall: 65.35 inches.

Notes: Today is the 227th day of 2017 and the 56th day of Summer. There are 138 days left in the year.

Readings taken at 0700 hours Central Standard Time (1300 GMT) daily, just west of the Monroe-Conecuh County line and south of U.S. Highway 84, near Excel, Alabama, USA, in the vicinity of Lat 31.42834N Lon 87.30131W. Elevation 400 feet above sea level. CoCoRaHS Station No. AL-MN-4, Station Name: Excel 2.5 ESE.

Monday, August 14, 2017

The Evergreen Courant's Sports Flashback for Aug. 14, 2017

Congressman Lister Hill
11 YEARS AGO
AUG. 17, 2006

Sparta is scheduled to play East Memorial Christian Academy Aug. 26 at 7 p.m. in Prattville. Floyd said the game will be played at Prattville High School’s stadium on artificial turf.
Last Thursday’s scrimmage with Dixie Academy in Evergreen left Floyd feeling good about the defense and concerned about the offensive line play.
(Players on Sparta’s team that year included Gaston Bozeman, Chase Brown, Taylor Brown, D.J. Buckhault, Kyle Cinereski, Peyton Thompson, Myles Wiggins and J.R. Williams.)

Hillcrest High School head football coach Maurice Belser said he hopes to build a winning program with good coaching and lots of support for his players.
Hillcrest opened the second full week of summer practice Monday with 52 players dressed out. Belser said the team’s first full contact practice last Friday produced some good results.
Hillcrest will kick off its regular season Sept. 1 against Geneva County High School in Evergreen at 7 p.m. Geneva County dropped from Class 4A to Class 3A this season.
(Players on Hillcrest’s team that season included receiver Conrad Atkins, receiver Blake Bryant, John Dees, halfback Jarvis Holder, eighth-grade quarterback Justin Nared, halfback Derrick Page, Neal Presley, Roderick Rudolph and Derrick Smith.)

36 YEARS AGO
AUG. 20, 1981

Horse show Saturday: Steve Coker and his Palomino filly “Sparkle” join in inviting everyone to come out to the Lyeffion Saddle Club Arena Saturday for a barbecue and horse show starting at 5 p.m. The event is sponsored by the Lyeffion High School FFA and the Saddle Club and all proceeds go to the FFA Chapter. There will be entertainment for all from a special children’s event to a wild cow milking… so, the sponsors say: “Y’all come out for some fun and good food… see you there!” The arena is on Highway 83 North.

61 YEARS AGO
AUG. 16, 1956

Aggies Begin Initial Football Practice On Friday, Aug. 24: One of the smallest squads in recent years will greet head coach Wendell Hart on next Friday, Aug. 24, when initial football drills begin at Evergreen High School. Hart expects about 30 boys out, but there will be several more by the time school opens in September.
The squad will be one of the shortest on manpower, depth and experience to represent the local school in the last five years. Only six lettermen return from last year’s fine team – five linemen and one back. Returning lettermen are Capt. Wayne Frazier, tackle; alternate captain Russell Deason, tackle; James Nelson, guard; Bert Cook, end; Mickey Joyner, end; and Bert Tuggle, halfback.
There will be great deal of help coming up from the B team, but even with this, the ranks will still be pretty thin according to Coach Hart. He believes that the Aggies can produce a top-notch line, barring injuries, and if several of the ‘green’ backs come through, they should field a good team.
Opening drills will be limited to conditioning workouts with the boys really getting down to the hard work about the middle of next week. As soon as the boys get into shape, the work will be long and hard as there will be only a little over two weeks after the first practice until the tough season’s opener with powerful Atmore.
As this was written, there still was no replacement to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of assistant coach John Robinson, who resigned last week. There is an extreme shortage of both teachers and coaches over the state.

Senior League Battle Is Tight All The Way: The battle for dominance in the Evergreen Senior Baseball League continues close all the way as only one game separates the leading Barons and the cellar dwelling Chicks. The Crackers and the Bears are tied for second place with even .500 averages, only a half game off the pace.
Howard Claybrook leads the batters in the League with a torrid .650 average closely followed by Bill Ivey with a .642 and Robert Ellington with an even .600.
(Other leading batters included Byron Warren Jr., .467; George Bolton, .467; Gordon Sims, .454; Dale Wiggins, .442; Gerald Howington, .388; Billie Grace, .367; and Leland Burgess, .317.)

Cats Take Over Lead In City Softball Play: Homer Riley’s Cats pounded Francis Williams’ Parts Pups by a 14-5 count last Wednesday night to jump into the lead in the City Softball loop. In the other game of the evening, Jimmy Murphy’s Panthers pulled their second straight big upset by downing the powerful Rebels, 8-6.

86 YEARS AGO
AUG. 13, 1931

Entries In Terrapin Derby Come From Far Near: Interest in the International Terrapin Derby to be held here Sept. 5 continues to grow with entries coming from all sections of the United States and from foreign counties. Five states and one foreign country are represented thus far with registrations only just begun.
Lion L.J. Kelly, chairman of registrations, states that he is receiving entries with each day’s mail from persons away from here. The registrations committee has centered its efforts so far in securing entries from persons elsewhere.
Congressman Hill Enters: Among the most notable to enter the derby thus far is Congressman Lister Hill of Montgomery. Mr. Hill is a full-fledged entrant and will be among the leading contenders for the first prize. He will send the name of his racer at a later date.
International Officers Register: Julian C. Hyer, President of Lions International of Ft. Forth, Texas, is one of the most enthusiastic entrants yet heard from.
Another entry from Lions International is that of Harry A. Hill, Assistant Secretary, of Chicago, Ill.
Among other entrants to date are: S.R. Butler, State Tax Commissioner. He names his terrapin “Spot,” Montgomery Lions Club has entered “Bull Lion,” P.O. Herbert, Mgr. Eureka Fire Hose Col, Atlanta, Ga., enters “Lindy.” He says, “Name the turtle after the celebrated Lindbergh, calling him ‘Lindy’ for short and a long race.” W.S. Hewlett, director Lions International, Bridgeport, Conn, enters “Shellback.”
Mobile Club Represented: The Mobile Lions Club is sponsoring an entrant about which there is much speculation and doubt. Most other entrants are leaving the matter of selecting the terrapin to the local committee. The Mobile Club states that it has its own racer and that he is now being groomed for the race. Reports from there say that a large delegation of Lions from that city will be here on the day of the race to witness the event and to pull for their entrant.
Many other Lions Clubs in the state are expected to make entries before the time for closing. As said in the outset, the registration is only begun. It is confidently predicted that more than 100 entries will be made this year. The fee for registering an entrant is $2. If one expects the committee to furnish a terrapin, add 25 cents to cover this cost. Fifty percent of the entrance fees will be divided among the four winners as follows: first, 25 percent; second, 15 percent; third and fourth, five percent each. The other 50 percent will go to the Boy Scouts.

Methodists Defeat Baptists By Score, 9-6: In an exciting game played at Gantt Field Thursday afternoon the Methodists defeated the Baptists by the score of 9-6. The score was tied on two different occasions, at the end of the third inning and in the sixth. In the seventh, the Methodists succeeded in putting over three more scores to win the game.”

111 YEARS AGO
AUG. 17, 1906

Belleville and Evergreen ball teams played ball here Wednesday. Evergreen defeated Belleville by a score of 19 to 9.

Today in History for Aug. 14, 2017

Edward DeWelden Brenneman
Aug. 14, 1040 – King Duncan I was killed in battle against his first cousin and rival Macbeth. The latter succeeded him as King of Scotland.


Aug. 14, 1720 – The Spanish military Villasur expedition was wiped out by Pawnee and Otoe warriors near present-day Columbus, Nebraska.

Aug. 14, 1776 - The city of Boston observed the 11th anniversary of the popular resistance that prevented the execution of the Stamp Act there on this day in 1776. The celebration included the erection of a pole at the site of the original “Liberty Tree.”

Aug. 14, 1779 - An expedition from Massachusetts attacked a British garrison at Castine on the Penobscot Peninsula. The plan ended in disaster as Commodore Dudley Saltonstall retreated and burned his own ships.

Aug. 14, 1828 – Frederick Williams became the postmaster at Burnt Corn, Ala.

Aug. 14, 1834 - Nineteen-year-old Richard Henry Dana, author of “Two Years Before the Mast,” began his two-year stint as a seaman. During his two years at sea, he sailed to California, then around Cape Horn, then back to Boston. In 1840, he published “Two Years Before the Mast,” a highly popular autobiographical account of the abuse endured by seamen.

Aug. 14, 1839 – Union surgeon Edward DeWelden Brenneman was born on this day in Lancaster, Pa. He would go on to receive his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1861. In July 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg, Brenneman would amputate Confederate soldier Mitchell Burford Salter’s right arm. Salter was a member of the Conecuh Guards, and the bone from his amputated arm is currently on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, D.C.

Aug. 14, 1842 – The Second Seminole War ended with the Seminoles forced from Florida to Oklahoma.

Aug. 14, 1848 – The Oregon Territory was organized by act of Congress.

Aug. 14, 1851 – John Henry “Doc” Holliday was born in Griffin, Ga.

Aug. 14, 1861 - Just months after he surrendered Fort Sumter, Union General Robert Anderson was named commander of the Department of the Kentucky. Released by Confederates nearly six weeks after the surrender of Fort Sumter, Anderson was promoted to brigadier general. He was given command of the Department of Kentucky and carefully maintained the balance of neutrality in the state.

Aug. 14, 1862 - Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith began an invasion of Kentucky as part of a Confederate plan to draw the Yankee army of General Don Carlos Buell away from Chattanooga, Tenn. and to raise support for the Southern cause in Kentucky. Smith led 10,000 troops out of Knoxville, Tennessee, on August 14 and moved toward the Cumberland Gap—the first step in the Confederate invasion of Kentucky. After a Federal force evacuated the pass in the face of the invasion, Smith continued north.

Aug. 14, 1862 – During the Civil War, under orders from Halleck, McClellan withdrew from the Peninsula.

Aug. 14, 1862 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Grande Robde Prairie in the Oregon Territory; near Barry, Mo.; and near Mount Pleasant, Tenn.

Aug. 14, 1863 - A temporary Union jail in Kansas City collapsed. Confederate guerrilla leader William 'Bloody Bill" Anderson's 14-year-old sister was killed and his other two sisters were injured. Pro-Confederate William C. Quantrill exacted revenge on Lawrence, Kansas on August 21. The band killed 150 residents and much of the town was burned.

Aug. 14, 1863 – During the Civil War, Union troops advanced on Little Rock, Ark., and an engagement took place at West Point, Ark.

Aug. 14, 1863 – During the Civil War, skirmishes were fought at Washington, N.C.; at Jack's Fork, Sherwood and Wellington, Mo.; and at Craven's Plantation, Miss.

Aug. 14, 1863 – Poet Ernest Thayer was born in Lawrence, Mass. He is best known for his 1888 poem, “Casey at the Bat.”

Aug. 14, 1864 - Union General Ulysses S. Grant's troops began attacking Confederate fortifications around Deep Bottom Run.

Aug. 14, 1864 – During the Civil War, multiple skirmishes were fought at New Market Road, Bailey's Creek, Charles City Road, Gravel Hill and Fussell's Mill in Virginia with more skirmishing near Strasburg, Va. Heavy skirmishing also occurred at Dalton, Georgia; and skirmishes were also fought at Hurricane Creek and Lamar in Mississippi.

Aug. 14, 1865 - Mississippi conventions passed an ordinance voiding the secession ordinance of 1861.

Aug. 14, 1879 – Former Monroe Journal publisher Horace Hood began publishing The Montgomery Journal in Montgomery, Ala.

Aug. 14, 1885 – The Monroe Journal reported that U.S. Marshal Allen had appointed J.S. Hines of Perdue Hill as deputy marshal for Monroe County.

Aug. 14, 1885 – The Monroe Journal reported that The Evergreen Star had begun publication in an “enlarged form” with seven columns and new, large type.

Aug. 14, 1896 - Gold was discovered in Canada's Yukon Territory. Within the next year more than 30,000 people rushed to the area to look for gold.

Aug. 14, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported that the “extreme warm weather for the past few days has injured the cotton crop considerably, and is causing it to open very fast.”

Aug. 14, 1896 - The Monroe Journal reported that the Alabama River steamer Tinsie Moore had come off the docks where she had been thoroughly overhauled and repaired, inside and out, preparatory to beginning her fall trade. She was to make her initial trip to Montgomery and all way landings, leaving Mobile on the afternoon of Aug. 15.

Aug. 14, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported that at the recent term of the commissioners court, the voting places known as Seigler’s Mill and Hunter’s Mill, in Beat 2, were abolished and a new one established at the school house in Section 14, Township 5, Range 6.

Aug. 14, 1896 – The Monroe Journal reported that Capt. Wiggins had had his new residence neatly painted, and it presented “a most attractive appearance.”

Aug. 14, 1896 - During a thunderstorm near River Ridge on this Friday, four children of W.A. Griffin were severely shocked by lightning. One of them, a young lady, sustained painful injuries, according to The Monroe Journal.

Aug. 14, 1905 – Mrs. Craighead, the wife of Mobile Daily Register editor, the Hon. Erwin Craighead, was scheduled to address the people of Monroeville, Ala. in the Circuit Court Room at 8 p.m. on this Monday on the subject of “School Improvement Associations.”

Aug. 14, 1905 – The Monroe County Board of Education held a special meeting in Monroeville, Ala. Superintendent J.D. Forte, Secretary J.A. Barnes, E.J. Hardy and T.B. Nettles were in attendance.

Aug. 14, 1907 – The Evergreen Courant reported that a cavalry company was to be organized in Evergreen within the next 10 days. E.C. Barnes and J.A. Rumbley were the recruiting officers, and prospective troopers were instructed to see them and join the troops at once. There were only three states in the Union that had cavalry troops - Illinois, New York and Pennsylvania – and Alabama was to be the fourth. The Courant also reported that Capt. Duke Guice of Greenville was in Evergreen looking for recruits for a cavalry company that week.

Aug. 14, 1911 - C.S. Thames, who had been employed in Reid’s barber shop for several months, died suddenly on this Monday night, the cause of his death being acute indigestion. The body was taken to Red Level for interment. The young man was about 27 years of age and bore an excellent reputation for honesty, sobriety and thrift. He was a member of the Masonic and Woodmen orders.

Aug. 14, 1914 – During World War I, the Battle of Lorraine started and resulted in an unsuccessful French offensive designed to recover the lost province of Moselle from Germany.

Aug. 14, 1915 – Charles Morris and Walter Murphee were charged with highway robbery and placed in the Conecuh County Jail after they allegedly robbed I.S. Hyde of Herbert, Ala. of $23.50 around 2 p.m. on this Saturday near the home of Mrs. Temple Rutland. Hyde returned to Herbert, described the two robbers to his neighbors, who caught Morris and Murphee when they appeared in Herbert later that night.

Aug. 14, 1915 – A baseball game was played in Conecuh County’s Bowles community on this Saturday afternoon and was attended by Edgar Adams, J.T. Bolton, Percy Burnie and Clinton Sanders.

Aug. 14, 1916 - Miss Jennie Faulk left Monroeville on this Monday for the market where she was to spend a couple of weeks selecting her fall stock of millinery.

Aug. 14, 1917 - As World War I entered its fourth year, China abandoned its neutrality and declared war on Germany.

Aug. 14, 1921 – H.P. Lovecraft completed “The Other Gods,” which was originally published in the Nov. 1933 issue of The Fantasy Fan.

Aug. 14, 1925 – Journalist and humorist Russell Baker was born in Loudoun County, Va.

Aug. 14, 1926 - The first bale of the 1926 crop of cotton to appear in Evergreen came on this Saturday. It was grown by Will Watts on the farm of L.L. Moorer. Evergreen Gin Co. ginned the bale and purchased the seeds at a rate of $30 per ton, which was approximately $10 above the marked price.

Aug. 14, 1930 – National Baseball Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver was born in St. Louis, Mo. He played his entire career for the Baltimore Orioles and managed the Orioles for 17 years. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1996.

Aug. 14, 1935 - U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law. The act created unemployment insurance and pension plans for the elderly.

Aug. 14, 1936 – Rainey Bethea was hanged in Owensboro, Kentucky in the last public execution in the United States.

Aug. 14, 1937 - The Detroit Tigers and the St. Louis Browns set an American League record for most runs scored combined in a doubleheader with 36.

Aug. 14, 1940 – On this Wednesday morning, around 2 a.m., a fire was discovered in the rear of the barn of E.T. Millsap in Monroeville. The fire was quickly extinguished without serious damage to the building.

Aug. 14, 1941 - The U.S. Congress appropriated the funds to construct the Pentagon (approximately $83 million). The building was the new home of the U.S. War Department.

Aug. 14, 1943 – National Baseball Hall of Fame outfielder and manager Joe Kelley passed away at the age of 71 in Baltimore, Md. During his career, he played for the Boston Beaneaters, the Pittsburgh Pirates, the Baltimore Orioles, the Brooklyn Superbas, the Cincinnati Reds and the Boston Doves, and he also managed the Reds and the Doves. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1971.

Aug. 14, 1945 - It was announced by U.S. President Truman that Japan had surrendered unconditionally. The surrender ended World War II.

Aug. 14, 1945 – Humorist Steve Martin was born in Waco, Texas.

Aug. 14, 1945 – The Viet Minh launched the August Revolution amid the political confusion and power vacuum engulfing Vietnam.

Aug. 14, 1947 – Novelist Danielle Steel was born in New York City.

Aug. 14, 1950 – Cartoonist Gary Larson, the creator of “The Far Side,” was born in Tacoma, Wash.

Aug. 14, 1952 – The Evergreen Courant reported that two soldiers from Conecuh County – Master Sgt. A.D. Clark of Castleberry and Cpl. Franklin D. Smith of Castleberry – had been awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge for service with the 25th Infantry Division in Korea. Clark, who joined the Army in December 1950, was the first sergeant of HQ Co., 14th Infantry Regiment. Smith, who joined the Army in January 1951 and arrived in Korea on May 1, 1952, was an automatic rifleman in Co. K of the 5th Regiment.

Aug. 14, 1952 – The Courant reported that an “extra large” egg, that weighed six ounces, from a hen owned by Ruby Wright, who lived on Main Street in Evergreen, was cracked and revealed another complete egg inside it. Between the two eggs, there were two yolks in addition to another two yolks inside the inner egg.

Aug. 14, 1953 - The whiffle ball was invented.

Aug. 14, 1957 - Miss Barbara Binion, 19, of Monroeville was selected to represent Monroe County in the 1957 Alabama “Maid of Cotton” in October at the State Fair in Birmingham. Binion was chosen Monroe County “Maid of Cotton” from among nine contestants at the annual Farm Bureau meeting in Monroeville on this Wednesday night. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Binion of Monroeville. Alternate chosen was Miss Eldora Wasden of Excel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.F. Wasden.

Aug. 14, 1958 - Vic Power of the Cleveland Indians stole home twice during the same game.

Aug. 14, 1959 - The first meeting was held to organize the American Football League.

Aug. 14, 1961 - The Philadelphia Phillies extended their losing streak to 17 games with a loss to the Chicago Cubs.

Aug. 14, 1964 – The Alabama North-South All-Star Football Game was played at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, and the South Team’s roster included Frisco City High School quarterback Joe Kelly, who had signed a scholarship to play for Ole Miss.

Aug. 14, 1964 – FBI agents arrested Lawrence Earl Vonderau, 20, and Junior Wesley Bernard, 39 (some sources say 30), both of Brewton in connection with the robbery of the Union Bank at Repton on June 20, 1964. Vonderau was said to have robbed the bank of $16,386, and Bernard was said to have drove the get-away vehicle. At the time of their arrest, $2,350 of the stolen money was recovered by the FBI from Vonderau.

Aug. 14, 1964 – NFL running back Neal Anderson was born in Dothan, Ala. He went on to play for Graceville (Fla.) High School, the University of Florida and the Chicago Bears.

Aug. 14, 1964 - Hanoi was reported to be holding air-raid drills for fear of more U.S. attacks in the wake of the Pierce Arrow retaliatory raids that had been flown in response to the Gulf of Tonkin incident.

Aug. 14, 1965 - The advance units of the Seventh Marines land at Chu Lai, bringing U.S. Marine strength in South Vietnam to four regiments and four air groups.

Aug. 14, 1965 – New Evergreen High School Head Football Coach Cliff Little was scheduled to hold a football meeting on this Saturday at 6 p.m. for all boys interested in playing that fall. They were to meet him at Memorial Gymnasium for a get acquainted session and to receive information for opening practice sessions. The first practice was to be held Mon., Aug. 16, at a time to be given the boys at the meeting. It would probably be two-a-days drills for the Aggie candidates for several days as much work had to be done prior to the opener in Atmore on Sept. 10. Coach Little and Perry Outlaw held a planning session on Mon., Aug. 9, before Outlaw had to report back to his military assignment at summer camp. The assistant football and head baseball coach planned to be in Evergreen for the Aug. 16 practice. Little said that he had not had an opportunity to meet all of the boys, but had gone over the expected prospects with Coach John Law Robinson, who resigned at the end of the school year to devote his full time to his farm and beef cattle interests. The new coach said that it is obvious that the team would be short on experience with only four lettermen back and only a handful with any playing time. At that time, he expected lettermen Tommy Hartley, Mike Moorer, Brent Thornley and Arlie Phillips and such 1964 reserves as Rusty Price and Winston Bailey and Olen Robinson, a transfer from Vigor, to for the hard corps of the squad. Little said he looked forward to working with Coach Outlaw and with Principal Morris Ward. He said he was counting on Ward for counsel and advice from his years as one of the state’s top high school coaches. Coach Little urged all boys who planned to play to be at the meeting Saturday night, Aug. 16.

Aug. 14, 1971 - St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Bob Gibson threw the first (and only) no-hitter of his storied career, helping his team to an 11-0 victory over the Pittsburgh Pirates. It was the first no-hitter at Forbes Field in 61 years.

Aug. 14, 1972 - Former Attorney General Ramsey Clark reported after his tour of North Vietnam with the International Commission of Inquiry into U.S. War Crimes in Indochina, that if Democratic candidate George McGovern were elected president in November, all U.S. POWs would be freed by North Vietnam within three months.

Aug. 14, 1973 – The William T. Shepard House in Opp was added to National Register of Historic Places.

Aug. 14, 1973 - After several days of intense bombing in support of Lon Nol’s forces fighting the communist Khmer Rouge in the area around Phnom Penh, Operations Arc Light and Freedom Deal ended as the United States ceased bombing Cambodia at midnight.

Aug. 14, 1974 - The NFL Players Association ended their seven-week strike.

Aug. 14, 1975 – Local citizens thanked the Evergreen City Council and the Conecuh County Board of Education for the recently completed improvements to the public tennis court behind Memorial Gymnasium at Evergreen High School. The court had been resurfaced and a new fence had been erected around it.

Aug. 14, 1977 – Major League Baseball outfielder Juan Pierre was born in Mobile, Ala. He went on to play for the Colorado Rockies, the Florida Marlins, the Chicago Cubs, the Los Angeles Dodgers, the Chicago White Sox, the Philadelphia Phillies and the Miami Marlins.

Aug. 14, 1979 - Lou Brock of the St. Louis Cardinals got his 3,000th hit.

Aug. 14, 1980 – The Evergreen Courant reported that Ray Castleberry, well known Evergreen businessman, had qualified as a candidate for Chairman of the Conecuh County Commission and would be the Republican nominee in the November General Election. Ray was born in Evergreen and was a lifetime resident of Conecuh County. He grew up on a family farm six miles northwest of Castleberry and played a large part in farming operations for several years prior to attending college. He was a graduate of Conecuh County High School in Castleberry, Jefferson Davis State Junior College in Brewton, and the University of South Alabama in Mobile. He had completed additional studies at the University of Alabama in Birmingham School of Community and Allied Health Resources.

Aug. 14, 1980 - Conecuh County High School’s Quarterback Club was scheduled to meet on this night at seven o’clock at the school gymnasium. All members and persons interested in the school’s athletic program were urged to attend.

Aug. 14, 1980 - There was to be a meeting of the Evergreen High School Quarterback Club on this night at 7:30 p.m. in the school lunchroom.

Aug. 14, 1981 – In front of a large crowd, Evergreen, Ala. Mayor Lee F. Smith cut the ribbon during the grand opening of the Johnson Furniture & Salvage Co., which was located in the former American Salvage Co. building on the corner of Rural Street and Jackson Street in downtown Evergreen.

Aug. 14, 1982 - Bill Neal paddled across the English Channel in a steel bathtub in 13.5 hours.

Aug. 14, 1984 – Major League Baseball catcher and manager Spud Davis passed away in Birmingham, Ala. at the age of 79. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals, the Philadelphia Phillies, the Cincinnati Reds and the Pittsburgh, Pirates. He also managed the Pirates for one season.

Aug. 14, 1986 - Pete Rose of the Cincinnati Reds had his 4,256th and last basehit in a game against the San Francisco Giants.

Aug. 14, 1987 - Mark McGwire set the record for major league home runs by a rookie when he connected for his 49th home run of the season.

Aug. 14, 1997 - Timothy McVeigh was formally sentenced to death for the Oklahoma City bombing.

Aug. 14, 1999 – National Baseball Hall of Fame shortstop Pee Wee Reese passed away at the age of 81 in Louisville, Ky. He played his entire career for the Brooklyn Dodgers and the Los Angeles Dodgers. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1984.

Aug. 14, 2000 - Police in Los Angeles, Calif. fired pepper spray and rubber bullets to clear a crowd of 9,000 people when a free concert by Rage Against the Machine turned violent.

Aug. 14, 2003 - A blackout hit the Northeast United States, with 21 power plants shutting down within just three minutes. Fifty million people were affected, in some places for more than a day.
  
Aug. 14, 2006 - Hillcrest High School, under head football coach Maurice Belser, opened the second full week of summer practice on this Monday with 52 players dressed out. Hillcrest was scheduled to kick off its regular season on Sept. 1 against Geneva County High School in Evergreen at 7 p.m. Geneva County dropped from Class 4A to Class 3A that season. Players on Hillcrest’s team that season included receiver Conrad Atkins, receiver Blake Bryant, John Dees, halfback Jarvis Holder, eighth-grade quarterback Justin Nared, halfback Derrick Page, Neal Presley, Roderick Rudolph and Derrick Smith.

Aug. 14, 2007 – “Doctor Strange: The Sorcerer Supreme,” an animated direct-to-DVD movie, was released.

Aug. 14, 2007 - Thomasville, Ala. voted to legalize alcohol sales.
  

Aug. 14, 2015 – The US Embassy in Havana, Cuba re-opened after 54 years of being closed when Cuba–United States relations were broken off.